14.070 Music


Jody Carter
 

First time I've ever heard something like this - is it common????

Will QSY to 40m, I guess.


Harry Wilkins
 

 

Haven't heard it here today, rarely hear music but there is at least one station out there that uses the computer soundcard for audio.  Quite often you can hear it boot or other computer sounds.  One day you could hear him playing solitaire!  Doesn't mute the mic either, I've been able to hear voices in the background but not enough to identify the station of course.  Fortunately it doesn't usually last very long nor is it all that frequent but it does happen.

 

Harry, K9HW

From: 070@... [mailto:070@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2017 10:40 AM
To: 070 List Service 070 List Service
Subject: [070] 14.070 Music

 

 

First time I've ever heard something like this - is it common????

 

Will QSY to 40m, I guess.


Jerry N9AVY
 

In hear a lot of this... mostly on 20m.    I hear computer sign on sounds, people talking on voice, music and whatever.  It has been going on for past few years. 

 Mostly  I believe it's a bunch of people who use their computer for everything when they should have a dedicated computer for ham radio only. 

Jerry  n9avy



From: "'K9HW' k9hw@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@...
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 1:01 PM
Subject: RE: [070] 14.070 Music

 
 
Haven't heard it here today, rarely hear music but there is at least one station out there that uses the computer soundcard for audio.  Quite often you can hear it boot or other computer sounds.  One day you could hear him playing solitaire!  Doesn't mute the mic either, I've been able to hear voices in the background but not enough to identify the station of course.  Fortunately it doesn't usually last very long nor is it all that frequent but it does happen.
 
Harry, K9HW

From: 070@... [mailto:070@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2017 10:40 AM
To: 070 List Service 070 List Service
Subject: [070] 14.070 Music
 
 
First time I've ever heard something like this - is it common????
 
Will QSY to 40m, I guess.



Radio <radio@...>
 

Unbelievably  I have had people suggest that using your computer’s speakers and the mic input on another computer is a completely acceptable way to run sound card digital.  Just don’t sneeze :)

73 de Eric, KG6MZS


On Mar 5, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Jerry n9avy@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


In hear a lot of this... mostly on 20m.    I hear computer sign on sounds, people talking on voice, music and whatever.  It has been going on for past few years. 

 Mostly  I believe it's a bunch of people who use their computer for everything when they should have a dedicated computer for ham radio only.  

Jerry  n9avy



From: "'K9HW' k9hw@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@... 
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 1:01 PM
Subject: RE: [070] 14.070 Music

 
 
Haven't heard it here today, rarely hear music but there is at least one station out there that uses the computer soundcard for audio.  Quite often you can hear it boot or other computer sounds.  One day you could hear him playing solitaire!  Doesn't mute the mic either, I've been able to hear voices in the background but not enough to identify the station of course.  Fortunately it doesn't usually last very long nor is it all that frequent but it does happen.
 
Harry, K9HW
From: 070@... [mailto:070@...] 
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2017 10:40 AM
To: 070 List Service 070 List Service
Subject: [070] 14.070 Music
 
  
First time I've ever heard something like this - is it common????
 
Will QSY to 40m, I guess.





Jerry N9AVY
 

If you run that way  and you can whistle in baudot, you can run RTTY    :-)

Jerry  n9avy



From: "Radio radio@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@...
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 7:02 PM
Subject: Re: [070] 14.070 Music

 
Unbelievably  I have had people suggest that using your computer’s speakers and the mic input on another computer is a completely acceptable way to run sound card digital.  Just don’t sneeze :)

73 de Eric, KG6MZS


On Mar 5, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Jerry n9avy@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


In hear a lot of this... mostly on 20m.    I hear computer sign on sounds, people talking on voice, music and whatever.  It has been going on for past few years. 

 Mostly  I believe it's a bunch of people who use their computer for everything when they should have a dedicated computer for ham radio only.  

Jerry  n9avy



From: "'K9HW' k9hw@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@... 
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 1:01 PM
Subject: RE: [070] 14.070 Music

 
 
Haven't heard it here today, rarely hear music but there is at least one station out there that uses the computer soundcard for audio.  Quite often you can hear it boot or other computer sounds.  One day you could hear him playing solitaire!  Doesn't mute the mic either, I've been able to hear voices in the background but not enough to identify the station of course.  Fortunately it doesn't usually last very long nor is it all that frequent but it does happen.
 
Harry, K9HW
From: 070@... [mailto:070@...] 
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2017 10:40 AM
To: 070 List Service 070 List Service
Subject: [070] 14.070 Music
 
  
First time I've ever heard something like this - is it common????
 
Will QSY to 40m, I guess.







Ray Clements
 

That may not be the problem at all.

It is quite possible for a computer to have multiple sound "cards". The computer I use for my station has three sound cards.
One is the internal sound card connected to the internal speakers of the laptop. This is default sound card used for music, videos, error alert sounds, etc.
The second sound card is the one built into my ICOM 7600 radio that is used for digital sound card modes.

The third sound card is part of a sound mixer that is connected to my radio for SSB phone.

As long as I have the correct sound card selected for each software application, everything works fine. However, if I make a mistake and select one of the sound cards that are connected to my radio as the default sound card then any sounds generated by my computer can go out over the radio. Even if I had a computer dedicated to my station that I never used for anything else,  the default sound card setting could be set incorrectly.

I suspect improper sound card settings are the reason for strange sounds going out over the airwaves.


------ Original Message ------
Received: 07:02 PM CST, 03/05/2017
From: "Radio radio@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@...
Subject: Re: [070] 14.070 Music


 

Unbelievably  I have had people suggest that using your computer’s speakers and the mic input on another computer is a completely acceptable way to run sound card digital.  Just don’t sneeze :)


73 de Eric, KG6MZS


On Mar 5, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Jerry n9avy@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


In hear a lot of this... mostly on 20m.    I hear computer sign on sounds, people talking on voice, music and whatever.  It has been going on for past few years. 

 Mostly  I believe it's a bunch of people who use their computer for everything when they should have a dedicated computer for ham radio only.  

Jerry  n9avy



From: "'K9HW' k9hw@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@... 
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 1:01 PM
Subject: RE: [070] 14.070 Music

 
 
Haven't heard it here today, rarely hear music but there is at least one station out there that uses the computer soundcard for audio.  Quite often you can hear it boot or other computer sounds.  One day you could hear him playing solitaire!  Doesn't mute the mic either, I've been able to hear voices in the background but not enough to identify the station of course.  Fortunately it doesn't usually last very long nor is it all that frequent but it does happen.
 
Harry, K9HW
From: 070@... [mailto:070@...] 
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2017 10:40 AM
To: 070 List Service 070 List Service
Subject: [070] 14.070 Music
 
  
First time I've ever heard something like this - is it common????
 
Will QSY to 40m, I guess.







Morris WA4MIT
 

The vast majority of computer sold have only sound card you have to add a second sound card to use same computer for other purposes while on the air. Now back in windows 98 the sound card set up had many more options that you could mute the different inputs when you using one these new computers do not have these options. I have heard people playing games, what sounded like monitoring a repeater, you name it and its been sent out over the air. 
73 Morris WA4MIT


On Sunday, March 5, 2017 7:56 PM, "'Ray Clements' r.clements@... [070]" <070@...> wrote:


 
That may not be the problem at all.

It is quite possible for a computer to have multiple sound "cards". The computer I use for my station has three sound cards.
One is the internal sound card connected to the internal speakers of the laptop. This is default sound card used for music, videos, error alert sounds, etc.
The second sound card is the one built into my ICOM 7600 radio that is used for digital sound card modes.

The third sound card is part of a sound mixer that is connected to my radio for SSB phone.

As long as I have the correct sound card selected for each software application, everything works fine. However, if I make a mistake and select one of the sound cards that are connected to my radio as the default sound card then any sounds generated by my computer can go out over the radio. Even if I had a computer dedicated to my station that I never used for anything else,  the default sound card setting could be set incorrectly.

I suspect improper sound card settings are the reason for strange sounds going out over the airwaves.


------ Original Message ------
Received: 07:02 PM CST, 03/05/2017
From: "Radio radio@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@...
Subject: Re: [070] 14.070 Music


 
Unbelievably  I have had people suggest that using your computer’s speakers and the mic input on another computer is a completely acceptable way to run sound card digital.  Just don’t sneeze :)

73 de Eric, KG6MZS


On Mar 5, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Jerry n9avy@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


In hear a lot of this... mostly on 20m.    I hear computer sign on sounds, people talking on voice, music and whatever.  It has been going on for past few years. 

 Mostly  I believe it's a bunch of people who use their computer for everything when they should have a dedicated computer for ham radio only.  

Jerry  n9avy



From: "'K9HW' k9hw@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@... 
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 1:01 PM
Subject: RE: [070] 14.070 Music

 
 
Haven't heard it here today, rarely hear music but there is at least one station out there that uses the computer soundcard for audio.  Quite often you can hear it boot or other computer sounds.  One day you could hear him playing solitaire!  Doesn't mute the mic either, I've been able to hear voices in the background but not enough to identify the station of course.  Fortunately it doesn't usually last very long nor is it all that frequent but it does happen.
 
Harry, K9HW
From: 070@... [mailto:070@...] 
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2017 10:40 AM
To: 070 List Service 070 List Service
Subject: [070] 14.070 Music
 
  
First time I've ever heard something like this - is it common????
 
Will QSY to 40m, I guess.









David Westbrook
 

Mostly  I believe it's a bunch of people who use their computer for everything when they should have a dedicated computer for ham radio only. 

They should have a dedicated *soundcard* for the radio, not necessarily a dedicated computer.

And the soundcard (PC soundcard, or radio/interface device treated as a soundcard) just simply should not be set as the windows default soundcard.

With USB soundcards dirt cheap these days ( as little as $2 shipped; or $10 for the next quality tier), there's really no reason not to have one. 

73!
--david
KJ4IZW

On Sun, Mar 5, 2017 at 2:15 PM, Jerry n9avy@... [070] <070@...> wrote:
 

In hear a lot of this... mostly on 20m.    I hear computer sign on sounds, people talking on voice, music and whatever.  It has been going on for past few years. 

 Mostly  I believe it's a bunch of people who use their computer for everything when they should have a dedicated computer for ham radio only. 

Jerry  n9avy



From: "'K9HW' k9hw@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@...
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 1:01 PM
Subject: RE: [070] 14.070 Music

 
 
Haven't heard it here today, rarely hear music but there is at least one station out there that uses the computer soundcard for audio.  Quite often you can hear it boot or other computer sounds.  One day you could hear him playing solitaire!  Doesn't mute the mic either, I've been able to hear voices in the background but not enough to identify the station of course.  Fortunately it doesn't usually last very long nor is it all that frequent but it does happen.
 
Harry, K9HW
From: 070@... [mailto:070@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2017 10:40 AM
To: 070 List Service 070 List Service
Subject: [070] 14.070 Music
 
 
First time I've ever heard something like this - is it common????
 
Will QSY to 40m, I guess.




David, K9DWR
 

It’s not that hard to believe. I’ve actually heard it in action before. One contact I made with a guy in Texas was using a laptop out on his porch to do this and it worked great. I’m not saying I recommend it, but I’m not saying it’s a bad idea, either.


David, K9DWR
#1604 LONP #255
david@...

On Mar 5, 2017, at 19:02, Radio radio@... [070] <070@...> wrote:

Unbelievably I have had people suggest that using your computer’s speakers and the mic input on another computer is a completely acceptable way to run sound card digital. Just don’t sneeze :)


73 de Eric, KG6MZS


On Mar 5, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Jerry n9avy@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


In hear a lot of this... mostly on 20m. I hear computer sign on sounds, people talking on voice, music and whatever. It has been going on for past few years.

Mostly I believe it's a bunch of people who use their computer for everything when they should have a dedicated computer for ham radio only.


Jody - K3JZD
 

There are situations which would allow this to be done accidentally on a digital interface setup that relies on the VOX circuit to pickup the radio's PTT.  

For example, the microphone on my Icom IC-756pro3 is live all of the time - it does not connect and disconnect with the PTT Switch. So, if I had my always-live microphone connected, and I left the radio turned on with some digital mode software running, and I had a setup that relied on the VOX circuit to pickup the PTT, and then I got busy watching some YouTube video on the computer, then the microphone would pick that up audio and the VOX circuit would then key the transmitter. This always-live microphone situation may be typical for all Icom radios and maybe for some other brands. 

I do not use the VOX circuit to pickup my radio's PTT - my setup uses a COM Port. So what I just described is not a possibility for me.  However, I can still inject some unintentional audio while using a digital mode if I have left my always-live microphone plugged in. I watch my power output closely on my power meter.  If I see some fluttering in my power output whenever I am using some digital mode, that is a result of my live microphone picking up audio from the cooling fan in the radio or from my nearby 2 meter radio, or from any other nearby noise source.  So, although I will catch it quickly, and then unplug my microphone to eliminate it, I have been guilty of adding some garbage onto my digital signal for a short time once in a while.

Now, for me this is self induced pain because my Icom IC-756proIII has a USB-D Mode which is selected by pressing the USB button for 1 second after I am already in USB mode. If I remember to do that, then this USB-D Mode disables the microphone, eliminating the need for me to unplug it.  But, for one reason or another, I'm in the habit of [usually] unplugging my microphone so that I can move it out of the way.  So I hardly ever select that USB-D Mode.  Guess I should change my habit and start using that USB-D mode all of the time.

Jody - K3JZD


Jerry N9AVY
 

I've worked Greg, WA3GM, when he was in FL using his station in PA probably more than a few times.  Instead of sitting knee deep in snow, he's enjoying the fun & sun in FL and not dragging a rig and antennas around ! 

Jerry N9AVY  #454

From: "David Rock david@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@...
Sent: Monday, March 6, 2017 9:18 AM
Subject: Re: [070] 14.070 Music

It’s not that hard to believe. I’ve actually heard it in action before.  One contact I made with a guy in Texas was using a laptop out on his porch to do this and it worked great.  I’m not saying I recommend it, but I’m not saying it’s a bad idea, either.


David, K9DWR
#1604 LONP #255
david@...

> On Mar 5, 2017, at 19:02, Radio radio@... [070] <070@...> wrote:
>
> Unbelievably  I have had people suggest that using your computer’s speakers and the mic input on another computer is a completely acceptable way to run sound card digital.  Just don’t sneeze :)
>
>
> 73 de Eric, KG6MZS
>
>
>> On Mar 5, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Jerry n9avy@... [070] <070@...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> In hear a lot of this... mostly on 20m.    I hear computer sign on sounds, people talking on voice, music and whatever.  It has been going on for past few years.
>>
>>  Mostly  I believe it's a bunch of people who use their computer for everything when they should have a dedicated computer for ham radio only.




Ray Clements
 

My primary rig is an Icom 7600 that has a built in sound card interface for digital modes. It automatically disconnects the microphone when working digital modes. 

I also have an Icom 7000 that I use with a SignaLink interface. The microphone input on the IC7000 is "hot" anytime the rig is transmitting. 

The microphone connects to the  IC7000 via a RJ45 connector. I purchased a RJ45 connector (female to female) and a short RJ45 ethernet cable. I then cut the jumper wire inside of the F/F connector that feeds the microphone element. That allows all of the microphone buttons to continue to work, but no background sounds will be transmitted when using the SignaLink. I also have a second F/F connector with all of the jumpers intact that can be used when I am working phone.  

Although disconnecting the microphone element is easy with the RJ45 connectors, it should be possible to create a breakout box for any type of connector.

N9RWC


------ Original Message ------
Received: 10:04 AM CST, 03/06/2017
From: "k3jzd.jody@... [070]" <070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: [070] Re: 14.070 Music


 

There are situations which would allow this to be done accidentally on a digital interface setup that relies on the VOX circuit to pickup the radio's PTT.  

For example, the microphone on my Icom IC-756pro3 is live all of the time - it does not connect and disconnect with the PTT Switch. So, if I had my always-live microphone connected, and I left the radio turned on with some digital mode software running, and I had a setup that relied on the VOX circuit to pickup the PTT, and then I got busy watching some YouTube video on the computer, then the microphone would pick that up audio and the VOX circuit would then key the transmitter. This always-live microphone situation may be typical for all Icom radios and maybe for some other brands. 

I do not use the VOX circuit to pickup my radio's PTT - my setup uses a COM Port. So what I just described is not a possibility for me.  However, I can still inject some unintentional audio while using a digital mode if I have left my always-live microphone plugged in. I watch my power output closely on my power meter.  If I see some fluttering in my power output whenever I am using some digital mode, that is a result of my live microphone picking up audio from the cooling fan in the radio or from my nearby 2 meter radio, or from any other nearby noise source.  So, although I will catch it quickly, and then unplug my microphone to eliminate it, I have been guilty of adding some garbage onto my digital signal for a short time once in a while.

Now, for me this is self induced pain because my Icom IC-756proIII has a USB-D Mode which is selected by pressing the USB button for 1 second after I am already in USB mode. If I remember to do that, then this USB-D Mode disables the microphone, eliminating the need for me to unplug it.  But, for one reason or another, I'm in the habit of [usually] unplugging my microph one so that I can move it out of the way.  So I hardly ever select that USB-D Mode.  Guess I should change my habit and start using that USB-D mode all of the time.

Jody - K3JZD




Jerry N9AVY
 

Wouldn't it be simpler to just unplug the microphone ?  My West Mountain M8  runs fine with no mic.

Jerry  n9avy



From: "'Ray Clements' r.clements@... [070]" <070@...>
To: 070@...
Sent: Monday, March 6, 2017 10:34 AM
Subject: Re: [070] Re: 14.070 Music

 
My primary rig is an Icom 7600 that has a built in sound card interface for digital modes. It automatically disconnects the microphone when working digital modes. 

I also have an Icom 7000 that I use with a SignaLink interface. The microphone input on the IC7000 is "hot" anytime the rig is transmitting. 

The microphone connects to the  IC7000 via a RJ45 connector. I purchased a RJ45 connector (female to female) and a short RJ45 ethernet cable. I then cut the jumper wire inside of the F/F connector that feeds the microphone element. That allows all of the microphone buttons to continue to work, but no background sounds will be transmitted when using the SignaLink. I also have a second F/F connector with all of the jumpers intact that can be used when I am working phone.  

Although disconnecting the microphone element is easy with the RJ45 connectors, it should be possible to create a breakout box for any type of connector.

N9RWC


------ Original Message ------
Received: 10:04 AM CST, 03/06/2017
From: "k3jzd.jody@... [070]" <070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: [070] Re: 14.070 Music


 
There are situations which would allow this to be done accidentally on a digital interface setup that relies on the VOX circuit to pickup the radio's PTT.  

For example, the microphone on my Icom IC-756pro3 is live all of the time - it does not connect and disconnect with the PTT Switch. So, if I had my always-live microphone connected, and I left the radio turned on with some digital mode software running, and I had a setup that relied on the VOX circuit to pickup the PTT, and then I got busy watching some YouTube video on the computer, then the microphone would pick that up audio and the VOX circuit would then key the transmitter. This always-live microphone situation may be typical for all Icom radios and maybe for some other brands. 

I do not use the VOX circuit to pickup my radio's PTT - my setup uses a COM Port. So what I just described is not a possibility for me.  However, I can still inject some unintentional audio while using a digital mode if I have left my always-live microphone plugged in. I watch my power output closely on my power meter.  If I see some fluttering in my power output whenever I am using some digital mode, that is a result of my live microphone picking up audio from the cooling fan in the radio or from my nearby 2 meter radio, or from any other nearby noise source.  So, although I will catch it quickly, and then unplug my microphone to eliminate it, I have been guilty of adding some garbage onto my digital signal for a short time once in a while.

Now, for me this is self induced pain because my Icom IC-756proIII has a USB-D Mode which is selected by pressing the USB button for 1 second after I am already in USB mode. If I remember to do that, then this USB-D Mode disables the microphone, eliminating the need for me to unplug it.  But, for one reason or another, I'm in the habit of [usually] unplugging my microph one so that I can move it out of the way.  So I hardly ever select that USB-D Mode.  Guess I should change my habit and start using that USB-D mode all of the time.

Jody - K3JZD





David, K9DWR
 

Simpler, maybe; but where’s the fun in that? :-)


David, K9DWR
#1604 LONP #255
david@...

On Mar 6, 2017, at 10:46, Jerry n9avy@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


Wouldn't it be simpler to just unplug the microphone ? My West Mountain M8 runs fine with no mic.