kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning


Robert Johnstone
 

Just had a nice Rag Chew with KD8GGN in ohio this morning he was/is looking for critique on his signal quality.  Sugested he might call cq 070 members for some Elmers and some added info on the club.  A chance for helping keep ripple off the bands. Robert KD0FIP 1396 LONP 249


Ray Clements
 

There is only one way to accurately determine your PSK signal quality. That is with an IMD meter.

Any IMD readings that you might get on the receiving end are inaccurate due to the influence of other signals on the waterfall, S/N ratio, receiving filters, etc. 

The IMD meter as designed by KK7UQ is a standalone wide-band HF receiver that samples the PSK signal being broadcast by your antenna and independently calculates the actual IMD reading. There is no physical connection between the IMD meter and the radio or computer.

There are several web sites that discuss the IMD meter by KK7UQ (Google "IMD Meter"), but the only source for these meters currently is Jim Neutens KJ3N.  If you are interested, send Jim an email at  Jim Nuytens  and ask for current pricing and availability. The meter comes fully assembled and calibrated.

I got mine about a month ago for $139.95 plus Priority Mail shipping charges and would never want to work PSK without it again. Initially, I thought of it as a test instrument, but I now consider it to be an operating tool for use any time I work PSK.

It measures signals for PSK31 and PSK63, but not for PSK125. While that is not inexpensive, it is well worth the money if PSK is your primary mode of communication. I know it that it is the case for many 070 club members.

When you transmit, the meter will immediately begin to measure your signal. It will send both a visual and audio alarm if the IMD is below the standard.  For example, if you change frequency and forget to retune the antenna, the SWR will be higher than normal and your signal quality will drop. The alarm sounds and reminds me to retune the antenna.

Also, if you need to run a little higher power than normal to reach a distant station, or to bust a pileup, you can watch the IMD meter as you increase power to determine how far you can go before your signal quality deteriorates. Sending a high-power signal with poor signal quality is not going to help you reach the other station.

Of course, the IMD meter is an invaluable tool for setup of gain, power, etc. One thing you will find is that the optimal setup for 20 meters 14.070 MHz might not be the optimal setup for other bands or frequencies, but without the IMD meter, you would never be aware of the difference.

I learned about the IMD meter from another ham whose credentials include serving with NASA Mission Control for a number of the Gemini and Apollo flights. Thus, I valued his opinion enough to make the investment in the meter. I do not regret that decision.

Ray N9RWC


 

 


------ Original Message ------
Received: 09:39 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "shopr3@... [070]" <070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning



Brian (N2MLP)
 

Why not use a VSA scope?



========================

de N2MLP Brian

Monroe County PA





cid:21CA93CE-AC8F-4FA3-8151-4E18E044767E@comcast.net

========================



From: 070@yahoogroups.com [mailto:070@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, September 05, 2014 11:19 AM
To: 070@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning





There is only one way to accurately determine your PSK signal quality. That
is with an IMD meter.

Any IMD readings that you might get on the receiving end are inaccurate due
to the influence of other signals on the waterfall, S/N ratio, receiving
filters, etc.

The IMD meter as designed by KK7UQ is a standalone wide-band HF receiver
that samples the PSK signal being broadcast by your antenna and
independently calculates the actual IMD reading. There is no physical
connection between the IMD meter and the radio or computer.

There are several web sites that discuss the IMD meter by KK7UQ (Google "IMD
Meter"), but the only source for these meters currently is Jim Neutens KJ3N.
If you are interested, send Jim an email at Jim Nuytens
<jim.kj3n@verizon.net> and ask for current pricing and availability. The
meter comes fully assembled and calibrated.

I got mine about a month ago for $139.95 plus Priority Mail shipping charges
and would never want to work PSK without it again. Initially, I thought of
it as a test instrument, but I now consider it to be an operating tool for
use any time I work PSK.

It measures signals for PSK31 and PSK63, but not for PSK125. While that is
not inexpensive, it is well worth the money if PSK is your primary mode of
communication. I know it that it is the case for many 070 club members.

When you transmit, the meter will immediately begin to measure your signal.
It will send both a visual and audio alarm if the IMD is below the standard.
For example, if you change frequency and forget to retune the antenna, the
SWR will be higher than normal and your signal quality will drop. The alarm
sounds and reminds me to retune the antenna.

Also, if you need to run a little higher power than normal to reach a
distant station, or to bust a pileup, you can watch the IMD meter as you
increase power to determine how far you can go before your signal quality
deteriorates. Sending a high-power signal with poor signal quality is not
going to help you reach the other station.

Of course, the IMD meter is an invaluable tool for setup of gain, power,
etc. One thing you will find is that the optimal setup for 20 meters 14.070
MHz might not be the optimal setup for other bands or frequencies, but
without the IMD meter, you would never be aware of the difference.

I learned about the IMD meter from another ham whose credentials include
serving with NASA Mission Control for a number of the Gemini and Apollo
flights. Thus, I valued his opinion enough to make the investment in the
meter. I do not regret that decision.

Ray N9RWC








------ Original Message ------
Received: 09:39 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "shopr3@yahoo.com [070] <mailto:shopr3@yahoo.com%20[070]> "
<070@yahoogroups.com>
To: <070@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning





Just had a nice Rag Chew with KD8GGN in ohio this morning he was/is looking
for critique on his signal quality. Sugested he might call cq 070 members
for some Elmers and some added info on the club. A chance for helping keep
ripple off the bands. Robert KD0FIP 1396 LONP 249


Ray Clements
 

It has been many years since I have used an oscilloscope. I would love to have one in my ham shack, but I do not have room for one, even one of the newer ones that no longer need a CRT. I am sure a scope would allow you to analyze a PSK signal and other signals as well. The IMD meter is limited to the analysis of PSK signals; an oscilloscope has far greater utility. That is why I suggested the IMD meter only for those whose primary mode of operatin is PSK.

If I had an oscilloscope, I would not purchase the IMD meter; but for anyone without one, the IMD meter is a great alternative.
You just plug in the power supply, extend the antenna and flip the switch to the on position and the mode switch to either PSK31, PSK63, or even Field Strength. There are no connection that need to be made to the radio.

The IMD meter takes up minimal space, so I can keep it in view of my operating position at all times. 
The IMD meter is easily portable and can be taken to remote operations such as APE or Field Day.
You can even add a battery connector and run it off a 9V battery if necessary for use on pontoon boat or picnic table expeditions.
 

I have absolutely no financial interest in the IMD meter. I was just impressed with the way the meter works, so I wanted to share my opinion. I just wanted to make everyone aware of the existence of the meter so they can do their own research, just like I did. 


Ray N9RWC


 


------ Original Message ------
Received: 10:20 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "'N2MLP' n2mlp@... [070]" <070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: RE: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning



John Bower <poppajohnbower@...>
 

Concur with Ray 100% om IMD meter - no financial interest just a very satisfied user.
John KE4JB


On Fri, Sep 5, 2014 at 1:08 PM, 'Ray Clements' r.clements@... [070] <070@...> wrote:
 

It has been many years since I have used an oscilloscope. I would love to have one in my ham shack, but I do not have room for one, even one of the newer ones that no longer need a CRT. I am sure a scope would allow you to analyze a PSK signal and other signals as well. The IMD meter is limited to the analysis of PSK signals; an oscilloscope has far greater utility. That is why I suggested the IMD meter only for those whose primary mode of operatin is PSK.

If I had an oscilloscope, I would not purchase the IMD meter; but for anyone without one, the IMD meter is a great alternative.
You just plug in the power supply, extend the antenna and flip the switch to the on position and the mode switch to either PSK31, PSK63, or even Field Strength. There are no connection that need to be made to the radio.

The IMD meter takes up minimal space, so I can keep it in view of my operating position at all times. 
The IMD meter is easily portable and can be taken to remote operations such as APE or Field Day.
You can even add a battery connector and run it off a 9V battery if necessary for use on pontoon boat or picnic table expeditions.
 

I have absolutely no financial interest in the IMD meter. I was just impressed with the way the meter works, so I wanted to share my opinion. I just wanted to make everyone aware of the existence of the meter so they can do their own research, just like I did. 


Ray N9RWC


 


------ Original Message ------
Received: 10:20 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "'N2MLP' n2mlp@... [070]" <070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: RE: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning


 

Why not use a VSA scope?

========================

de N2MLP Brian

Monroe County PA

cid:21CA93CE-AC8F-4FA3-8151-4E18E044767E@...

========================

From: 070@... [mailto:070@...]
Sent: Friday, September 05, 2014 11:19 AM
To: 070@...
Subject: Re: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning

There is only one way to accurately determine your PSK signal quality. That
is with an IMD meter.

Any IMD readings that you might get on the receiving end are inaccurate due
to the influence of other signals on the waterfall, S/N ratio, receiving
filters, etc.

The IMD meter as designed by KK7UQ is a standalone wide-band HF receiver
that samples the PSK signal being broadcast by your antenna and
independently calculates the actual IMD reading. There is no physical
connection between the IMD meter and the radio or computer.

There are several web sites that discuss the IMD meter by KK7UQ (Google "IMD
Meter"), but the only source for these meters currently is Jim Neutens KJ3N.
If you are interested, send Jim an email at Jim Nuytens
<jim.kj3n@...> and ask for current pricing and availability. The
meter comes fully assembled and calibrated.

I got mine about a month ago for $139.95 plus Priority Mail shipping charges
and would never want to work PSK without it again. Initially, I thought of
it as a test instrument, but I now consider it to be an operating tool for
use any time I work PSK.

It measures signals for PSK31 and PSK63, but not for PSK125. While that is
not inexpensive, it is well worth the money if PSK is your primary mode of
communication. I know it that it is the case for many 070 club members.

When you transmit, the meter will immediately begin to measure your signal.
It will send both a visual and audio alarm if the IMD is below the standard.
For example, if you change frequency and forget to retune the antenna, the
SWR will be higher than normal and your signal quality will drop. The alarm
sounds and reminds me to retune the antenna.

Also, if you need to run a little higher power than normal to reach a
distant station, or to bust a pileup, you can watch the IMD meter as you
increase power to determine how far you can go before your signal quality
deteriorates. Sending a high-power signal with poor signal quality is not
going to help you reach the other station.

Of course, the IMD meter is an invaluable tool for setup of gain, power,
etc. One thing you will find is that the optimal setup for 20 meters 14.070
MHz might not be the optimal setup for other bands or frequencies, but
without the IMD meter, you would never be aware of the difference.

I learned about the IMD meter from another ham whose credentials include
serving with NASA Mission Control for a number of the Gemini and Apollo
flights. Thus, I valued his opinion enough to make the investment in the
meter. I do not regret that decision.

Ray N9RWC

------ Original Message ------
Received: 09:39 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "shopr3@... [070] shopr3@...%20[070]> "
<070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning

Just had a nice Rag Chew with KD8GGN in ohio this morning he was/is looking
for critique on his signal quality. Sugested he might call cq 070 members
for some Elmers and some added info on the club. A chance for helping keep
ripple off the bands. Robert KD0FIP 1396 LONP 249







Mark Perrin <n7mq@...>
 

Ditto.

Mark N7MQ

On 9/5/2014 10:47 AM, John Bower poppajohnbower@gmail.com [070] wrote:
Concur with Ray 100% om IMD meter - no financial interest just a very
satisfied user.
John KE4JB


On Fri, Sep 5, 2014 at 1:08 PM, 'Ray Clements' r.clements@usa.net [070] <
070@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


It has been many years since I have used an oscilloscope. I would love
to have one in my ham shack, but I do not have room for one, even one of
the newer ones that no longer need a CRT. I am sure a scope would allow
you to analyze a PSK signal and other signals as well. The IMD meter is
limited to the analysis of PSK signals; an oscilloscope has far greater
utility. That is why I suggested the IMD meter only for those whose primary
mode of operatin is PSK.

If I had an oscilloscope, I would not purchase the IMD meter; but for
anyone without one, the IMD meter is a great alternative.
You just plug in the power supply, extend the antenna and flip the switch
to the on position and the mode switch to either PSK31, PSK63, or even
Field Strength. There are no connection that need to be made to the radio.

The IMD meter takes up minimal space, so I can keep it in view of my
operating position at all times.
The IMD meter is easily portable and can be taken to remote operations
such as APE or Field Day.
You can even add a battery connector and run it off a 9V battery if
necessary for use on pontoon boat or picnic table expeditions.


I have absolutely no financial interest in the IMD meter. I was just
impressed with the way the meter works, so I wanted to share my opinion. I
just wanted to make everyone aware of the existence of the meter so they can
do their own research, just like I did.


Ray N9RWC





------ Original Message ------
*Received: *10:20 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
*From: *"'N2MLP' n2mlp@verizon.net [070]" <070@yahoogroups.com>
*To: *<070@yahoogroups.com>
*Subject: *RE: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning




Why not use a VSA scope?

========================
de N2MLP Brian

Monroe County PA

cid:21CA93CE-AC8F-4FA3-8151-4E18E044767E@comcast.net

========================
From: 070@yahoogroups.com [mailto:070@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, September 05, 2014 11:19 AM
To: 070@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning

There is only one way to accurately determine your PSK signal quality. That
is with an IMD meter.

Any IMD readings that you might get on the receiving end are inaccurate due
to the influence of other signals on the waterfall, S/N ratio, receiving
filters, etc.

The IMD meter as designed by KK7UQ is a standalone wide-band HF receiver
that samples the PSK signal being broadcast by your antenna and
independently calculates the actual IMD reading. There is no physical
connection between the IMD meter and the radio or computer.

There are several web sites that discuss the IMD meter by KK7UQ (Google
"IMD
Meter"), but the only source for these meters currently is Jim Neutens
KJ3N.
If you are interested, send Jim an email at Jim Nuytens
<jim.kj3n@verizon.net> and ask for current pricing and availability. The
meter comes fully assembled and calibrated.

I got mine about a month ago for $139.95 plus Priority Mail shipping
charges
and would never want to work PSK without it again. Initially, I thought of
it as a test instrument, but I now consider it to be an operating tool for
use any time I work PSK.

It measures signals for PSK31 and PSK63, but not for PSK125. While that is
not inexpensive, it is well worth the money if PSK is your primary mode of
communication. I know it that it is the case for many 070 club members.

When you transmit, the meter will immediately begin to measure your signal.
It will send both a visual and audio alarm if the IMD is below the
standard.
For example, if you change frequency and forget to retune the antenna, the
SWR will be higher than normal and your signal quality will drop. The alarm
sounds and reminds me to retune the antenna.

Also, if you need to run a little higher power than normal to reach a
distant station, or to bust a pileup, you can watch the IMD meter as you
increase power to determine how far you can go before your signal quality
deteriorates. Sending a high-power signal with poor signal quality is not
going to help you reach the other station.

Of course, the IMD meter is an invaluable tool for setup of gain, power,
etc. One thing you will find is that the optimal setup for 20 meters 14.070
MHz might not be the optimal setup for other bands or frequencies, but
without the IMD meter, you would never be aware of the difference.

I learned about the IMD meter from another ham whose credentials include
serving with NASA Mission Control for a number of the Gemini and Apollo
flights. Thus, I valued his opinion enough to make the investment in the
meter. I do not regret that decision.

Ray N9RWC

------ Original Message ------
Received: 09:39 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "shopr3@yahoo.com [070] <mailto:shopr3@yahoo.com%20[070]> "
<070@yahoogroups.com>
To: <070@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning

Just had a nice Rag Chew with KD8GGN in ohio this morning he was/is looking
for critique on his signal quality. Sugested he might call cq 070 members
for some Elmers and some added info on the club. A chance for helping keep
ripple off the bands. Robert KD0FIP 1396 LONP 249





-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8160 - Release Date: 09/05/14


Dan Morris - KZ3T
 

Great information Ray.  Thanks for all that.  I myself will definitely look into one.

Dan Morris   KZ3T



On Sep 5, 2014, at 1:08 PM, 'Ray Clements' r.clements@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


It has been many years since I have used an oscilloscope. I would love to have one in my ham shack, but I do not have room for one, even one of the newer ones that no longer need a CRT. I am sure a scope would allow you to analyze a PSK signal and other signals as well. The IMD meter is limited to the analysis of PSK signals; an oscilloscope has far greater utility. That is why I suggested the IMD meter only for those whose primary mode of operatin is PSK.

If I had an oscilloscope, I would not purchase the IMD meter; but for anyone without one, the IMD meter is a great alternative.
You just plug in the power supply, extend the antenna and flip the switch to the on position and the mode switch to either PSK31, PSK63, or even Field Strength. There are no connection that need to be made to the radio.

The IMD meter takes up minimal space, so I can keep it in view of my operating position at all times. 
The IMD meter is easily portable and can be taken to remote operations such as APE or Field Day.
You can even add a battery connector and run it off a 9V battery if necessary for use on pontoon boat or picnic table expeditions.
 

I have absolutely no financial interest in the IMD meter. I was just impressed with the way the meter works, so I wanted to share my opinion. I just wanted to make everyone aware of the existence of the meter so they can do their own research, just like I did. 


Ray N9RWC


 


------ Original Message ------
Received: 10:20 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "'N2MLP' n2mlp@... [070]" <070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: RE: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning


 

Why not use a VSA scope?

========================

de N2MLP Brian

Monroe County PA



========================

From: 070@... [mailto:070@...] 
Sent: Friday, September 05, 2014 11:19 AM
To: 070@...
Subject: Re: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning

There is only one way to accurately determine your PSK signal quality. That
is with an IMD meter. 

Any IMD readings that you might get on the receiving end are inaccurate due
to the influence of other signals on the waterfall, S/N ratio, receiving
filters, etc. 

The IMD meter as designed by KK7UQ is a standalone wide-band HF receiver
that samples the PSK signal being broadcast by your antenna and
independently calculates the actual IMD reading. There is no physical
connection between the IMD meter and the radio or computer. 

There are several web sites that discuss the IMD meter by KK7UQ (Google "IMD
Meter"), but the only source for these meters currently is Jim Neutens KJ3N.
If you are interested, send Jim an email at Jim Nuytens
<jim.kj3n@...> and ask for current pricing and availability. The
meter comes fully assembled and calibrated. 

I got mine about a month ago for $139.95 plus Priority Mail shipping charges
and would never want to work PSK without it again. Initially, I thought of
it as a test instrument, but I now consider it to be an operating tool for
use any time I work PSK. 

It measures signals for PSK31 and PSK63, but not for PSK125. While that is
not inexpensive, it is well worth the money if PSK is your primary mode of
communication. I know it that it is the case for many 070 club members. 

When you transmit, the meter will immediately begin to measure your signal.
It will send both a visual and audio alarm if the IMD is below the standard.
For example, if you change frequency and forget to retune the antenna, the
SWR will be higher than normal and your signal quality will drop. The alarm
sounds and reminds me to retune the antenna. 

Also, if you need to run a little higher power than normal to reach a
distant station, or to bust a pileup, you can watch the IMD meter as you
increase power to determine how far you can go before your signal quality
deteriorates. Sending a high-power signal with poor signal quality is not
going to help you reach the other station. 

Of course, the IMD meter is an invaluable tool for setup of gain, power,
etc. One thing you will find is that the optimal setup for 20 meters 14.070
MHz might not be the optimal setup for other bands or frequencies, but
without the IMD meter, you would never be aware of the difference. 

I learned about the IMD meter from another ham whose credentials include
serving with NASA Mission Control for a number of the Gemini and Apollo
flights. Thus, I valued his opinion enough to make the investment in the
meter. I do not regret that decision. 

Ray N9RWC 

------ Original Message ------ 
Received: 09:39 AM CDT, 09/05/2014 
From: "shopr3@... [070] <mailto:shopr3@...%20[070]> "
<070@...> 
To: <070@...> 
Subject: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning 

Just had a nice Rag Chew with KD8GGN in ohio this morning he was/is looking
for critique on his signal quality. Sugested he might call cq 070 members
for some Elmers and some added info on the club. A chance for helping keep
ripple off the bands. Robert KD0FIP 1396 LONP 249 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






Les Alverson <kd4sfd2@...>
 

For me it was to watch my ALC (yeasu ft-857) to where it moved, but NOT pegged and adjust TX audio and gain.� With the signalink this has been a very easy process, although I wish I still had line in and line out capabilities.� I also keep an eye on the SWR meter.

Les
k4lea 1746 lonp 272

On 9/5/2014 16:24, Dan Morris dbmorris315@... [070] wrote:
�

Great information Ray. �Thanks for all that. �I myself will definitely look into one.


Dan Morris � KZ3T



On Sep 5, 2014, at 1:08 PM, 'Ray Clements' r.clements@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


It has been many years since I have used an oscilloscope.�I would love to have one in my ham shack, but I do not have room for one, even one of the newer ones that no longer need a CRT.�I am sure a scope would allow you to analyze a PSK signal and other signals as well. The IMD meter is limited to the analysis of PSK signals; an oscilloscope has far greater utility. That is why I suggested the IMD meter only for those whose primary mode of operatin is PSK.

If I had an oscilloscope, I would not purchase the IMD meter; but for anyone without one, the IMD meter is a great alternative.
You just plug in the power supply, extend the antenna and flip the switch to the on position and the mode switch to either PSK31, PSK63, or even Field Strength. There are no connection that need to be made to the radio.

The IMD meter takes up minimal space, so I can keep it in view of my operating position at all times.�
The IMD meter is easily portable and can be taken to remote operations such as APE or Field Day.
You can even add a battery connector and run it off a 9V battery if necessary for use on pontoon boat or picnic table expeditions.
�

I have absolutely no financial interest in the IMD meter. I was just impressed with the way the meter works, so I wanted to share my opinion.�I just wanted to make everyone aware of the existence of the meter so they�can do their own research, just like I did.�


Ray N9RWC


�


------ Original Message ------
Received:�10:20 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From:�"'N2MLP'�n2mlp@...�[070]" <070@...>
To:�<070@...>
Subject:�RE: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning


�

Why not use a VSA scope?

========================

de N2MLP Brian

Monroe County PA



========================

From:�070@...�[mailto:070@...]�
Sent: Friday, September 05, 2014 11:19 AM
To:�070@...
Subject: Re: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning

There is only one way to accurately determine your PSK signal quality. That
is with an IMD meter.�

Any IMD readings that you might get on the receiving end are inaccurate due
to the influence of other signals on the waterfall, S/N ratio, receiving
filters, etc.�

The IMD meter as designed by KK7UQ is a standalone wide-band HF receiver
that samples the PSK signal being broadcast by your antenna and
independently calculates the actual IMD reading. There is no physical
connection between the IMD meter and the radio or computer.�

There are several web sites that discuss the IMD meter by KK7UQ (Google "IMD
Meter"), but the only source for these meters currently is Jim Neutens KJ3N.
If you are interested, send Jim an email at Jim Nuytens
<jim.kj3n@...> and ask for current pricing and availability. The
meter comes fully assembled and calibrated.�

I got mine about a month ago for $139.95 plus Priority Mail shipping charges
and would never want to work PSK without it again. Initially, I thought of
it as a test instrument, but I now consider it to be an operating tool for
use any time I work PSK.�

It measures signals for PSK31 and PSK63, but not for PSK125. While that is
not inexpensive, it is well worth the money if PSK is your primary mode of
communication. I know it that it is the case for many 070 club members.�

When you transmit, the meter will immediately begin to measure your signal.
It will send both a visual and audio alarm if the IMD is below the standard.
For example, if you change frequency and forget to retune the antenna, the
SWR will be higher than normal and your signal quality will drop. The alarm
sounds and reminds me to retune the antenna.�

Also, if you need to run a little higher power than normal to reach a
distant station, or to bust a pileup, you can watch the IMD meter as you
increase power to determine how far you can go before your signal quality
deteriorates. Sending a high-power signal with poor signal quality is not
going to help you reach the other station.�

Of course, the IMD meter is an invaluable tool for setup of gain, power,
etc. One thing you will find is that the optimal setup for 20 meters 14.070
MHz might not be the optimal setup for other bands or frequencies, but
without the IMD meter, you would never be aware of the difference.�

I learned about the IMD meter from another ham whose credentials include
serving with NASA Mission Control for a number of the Gemini and Apollo
flights. Thus, I valued his opinion enough to make the investment in the
meter. I do not regret that decision.�

Ray N9RWC�

------ Original Message ------�
Received: 09:39 AM CDT, 09/05/2014�
From: "shopr3@...�[070] <mailto:shopr3@...%20[070]> "
<070@...>�
To: <070@...>�
Subject: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning�

Just had a nice Rag Chew with KD8GGN in ohio this morning he was/is looking
for critique on his signal quality. Sugested he might call cq 070 members
for some Elmers and some added info on the club. A chance for helping keep
ripple off the bands. Robert KD0FIP 1396 LONP 249�

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







Rick - N7WE
 

Let me join the chorus in support of the IMD Meter!  Had one for many years and never had a problem with it. May not be as accurate as some would like and it is not a scope, but sure gives constant feedback about the quality of your signal.  The IMD Meter and an interface with a built-in soundcard makes staying clean a breeze!

disclaimer - no association or financial interest. Just love the product and frown on wide traces.

Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602  LONP #231


Matthew King - AK4MK
 

I follow Les' setup, only a bit more strictly.  I set the TX Audio level on my Signalink to just below where the ALC moves.

There's actually variations from one end to the other of the waterfall and certainly across bands that require it to be reset, unless it is set very low to begin with.  Trying to "set it at 40w" and forget it is likely to lead to some splattering from time to time. Forget to tune the antenna when you switch bands?  Oh yeah, the ALC will tell you really quickly, even if your SWR doesn't get out of hand.

I've found with this method and my FTdx3000 and a tuned 20m antenna that I can run *95* watts with a very, very clean trace and no artifacts.  Of course that's gonna obliterate nearby stations so I don't do it, but it just goes to show with proper tuning of the antenna and a close eye on the ALC, that one can have a very clean signal.

I frequently get unsolicited reports like "wow, clean signal" and "sharpest signal on the waterfall" so I'm gonna stick with it!

I've heard nothing but good things about the meter in question, and given 150 bucks lying around, I just might order one!

Matt
KK4CPS


On Fri, Sep 5, 2014 at 5:24 PM, Les Alverson kd4sfd2@... [070] <070@...> wrote:
 

For me it was to watch my ALC (yeasu ft-857) to where it moved, but NOT pegged and adjust TX audio and gain.  With the signalink this has been a very easy process, although I wish I still had line in and line out capabilities.  I also keep an eye on the SWR meter.

Les
k4lea 1746 lonp 272

On 9/5/2014 16:24, Dan Morris dbmorris315@... [070] wrote:
 

Great information Ray.  Thanks for all that.  I myself will definitely look into one.


Dan Morris   KZ3T



On Sep 5, 2014, at 1:08 PM, 'Ray Clements' r.clements@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


It has been many years since I have used an oscilloscope. I would love to have one in my ham shack, but I do not have room for one, even one of the newer ones that no longer need a CRT. I am sure a scope would allow you to analyze a PSK signal and other signals as well. The IMD meter is limited to the analysis of PSK signals; an oscilloscope has far greater utility. That is why I suggested the IMD meter only for those whose primary mode of operatin is PSK.

If I had an oscilloscope, I would not purchase the IMD meter; but for anyone without one, the IMD meter is a great alternative.
You just plug in the power supply, extend the antenna and flip the switch to the on position and the mode switch to either PSK31, PSK63, or even Field Strength. There are no connection that need to be made to the radio.

The IMD meter takes up minimal space, so I can keep it in view of my operating position at all times. 
The IMD meter is easily portable and can be taken to remote operations such as APE or Field Day.
You can even add a battery connector and run it off a 9V battery if necessary for use on pontoon boat or picnic table expeditions.
 

I have absolutely no financial interest in the IMD meter. I was just impressed with the way the meter works, so I wanted to share my opinion. I just wanted to make everyone aware of the existence of the meter so they can do their own research, just like I did. 


Ray N9RWC


 


------ Original Message ------
Received: 10:20 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "'N2MLP' n2mlp@... [070]" <070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: RE: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning


 

Why not use a VSA scope?

========================

de N2MLP Brian

Monroe County PA

cid:21CA93CE-AC8F-4FA3-8151-4E18E044767E@...

========================

From: 070@... [mailto:070@...] 
Sent: Friday, September 05, 2014 11:19 AM
To: 070@...
Subject: Re: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning

There is only one way to accurately determine your PSK signal quality. That
is with an IMD meter. 

Any IMD readings that you might get on the receiving end are inaccurate due
to the influence of other signals on the waterfall, S/N ratio, receiving
filters, etc. 

The IMD meter as designed by KK7UQ is a standalone wide-band HF receiver
that samples the PSK signal being broadcast by your antenna and
independently calculates the actual IMD reading. There is no physical
connection between the IMD meter and the radio or computer. 

There are several web sites that discuss the IMD meter by KK7UQ (Google "IMD
Meter"), but the only source for these meters currently is Jim Neutens KJ3N.
If you are interested, send Jim an email at Jim Nuytens
<jim.kj3n@...> and ask for current pricing and availability. The
meter comes fully assembled and calibrated. 

I got mine about a month ago for $139.95 plus Priority Mail shipping charges
and would never want to work PSK without it again. Initially, I thought of
it as a test instrument, but I now consider it to be an operating tool for
use any time I work PSK. 

It measures signals for PSK31 and PSK63, but not for PSK125. While that is
not inexpensive, it is well worth the money if PSK is your primary mode of
communication. I know it that it is the case for many 070 club members. 

When you transmit, the meter will immediately begin to measure your signal.
It will send both a visual and audio alarm if the IMD is below the standard.
For example, if you change frequency and forget to retune the antenna, the
SWR will be higher than normal and your signal quality will drop. The alarm
sounds and reminds me to retune the antenna. 

Also, if you need to run a little higher power than normal to reach a
distant station, or to bust a pileup, you can watch the IMD meter as you
increase power to determine how far you can go before your signal quality
deteriorates. Sending a high-power signal with poor signal quality is not
going to help you reach the other station. 

Of course, the IMD meter is an invaluable tool for setup of gain, power,
etc. One thing you will find is that the optimal setup for 20 meters 14.070
MHz might not be the optimal setup for other bands or frequencies, but
without the IMD meter, you would never be aware of the difference. 

I learned about the IMD meter from another ham whose credentials include
serving with NASA Mission Control for a number of the Gemini and Apollo
flights. Thus, I valued his opinion enough to make the investment in the
meter. I do not regret that decision. 

Ray N9RWC 

------ Original Message ------ 
Received: 09:39 AM CDT, 09/05/2014 
From: "shopr3@... [070] <mailto:shopr3@...%20[070]> "
<070@...> 
To: <070@...> 
Subject: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning 

Just had a nice Rag Chew with KD8GGN in ohio this morning he was/is looking
for critique on his signal quality. Sugested he might call cq 070 members
for some Elmers and some added info on the club. A chance for helping keep
ripple off the bands. Robert KD0FIP 1396 LONP 249 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








Rick - N7WE
 

One more thing about the IMD Meter.  Back in 2004 when Clint (KK7UQ) introduced it, it was available as a kit (all through hole construction) or fully built.  Sure would love to see that kit form made available again!  I'd buy one just for the joy of building it!

Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602  LONP #231


Les Alverson <kd4sfd2@...>
 

I found that if I had little or no ALC movement, I was sending only a carrier, no information.  If I set the TX to were the ALC was about mid-way, my SWR meter showed about the wattage I had set the radio to.

LEs
k4lea 1746 lonp 272

On 9/5/2014 17:39, Matthew King mrk.twg@... [070] wrote:
 
I follow Les' setup, only a bit more strictly.  I set the TX Audio level on my Signalink to just below where the ALC moves.

There's actually variations from one end to the other of the waterfall and certainly across bands that require it to be reset, unless it is set very low to begin with.  Trying to "set it at 40w" and forget it is likely to lead to some splattering from time to time. Forget to tune the antenna when you switch bands?  Oh yeah, the ALC will tell you really quickly, even if your SWR doesn't get out of hand.

I've found with this method and my FTdx3000 and a tuned 20m antenna that I can run *95* watts with a very, very clean trace and no artifacts.  Of course that's gonna obliterate nearby stations so I don't do it, but it just goes to show with proper tuning of the antenna and a close eye on the ALC, that one can have a very clean signal.

I frequently get unsolicited reports like "wow, clean signal" and "sharpest signal on the waterfall" so I'm gonna stick with it!

I've heard nothing but good things about the meter in question, and given 150 bucks lying around, I just might order one!

Matt
KK4CPS


On Fri, Sep 5, 2014 at 5:24 PM, Les Alverson kd4sfd2@... [070] <070@...> wrote:
 

For me it was to watch my ALC (yeasu ft-857) to where it moved, but NOT pegged and adjust TX audio and gain.  With the signalink this has been a very easy process, although I wish I still had line in and line out capabilities.  I also keep an eye on the SWR meter.

Les
k4lea 1746 lonp 272

On 9/5/2014 16:24, Dan Morris dbmorris315@... [070] wrote:
 

Great information Ray.  Thanks for all that.  I myself will definitely look into one.


Dan Morris   KZ3T



On Sep 5, 2014, at 1:08 PM, 'Ray Clements' r.clements@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


It has been many years since I have used an oscilloscope. I would love to have one in my ham shack, but I do not have room for one, even one of the newer ones that no longer need a CRT. I am sure a scope would allow you to analyze a PSK signal and other signals as well. The IMD meter is limited to the analysis of PSK signals; an oscilloscope has far greater utility. That is why I suggested the IMD meter only for those whose primary mode of operatin is PSK.

If I had an oscilloscope, I would not purchase the IMD meter; but for anyone without one, the IMD meter is a great alternative.
You just plug in the power supply, extend the antenna and flip the switch to the on position and the mode switch to either PSK31, PSK63, or even Field Strength. There are no connection that need to be made to the radio.

The IMD meter takes up minimal space, so I can keep it in view of my operating position at all times. 
The IMD meter is easily portable and can be taken to remote operations such as APE or Field Day.
You can even add a battery connector and run it off a 9V battery if necessary for use on pontoon boat or picnic table expeditions.
 

I have absolutely no financial interest in the IMD meter. I was just impressed with the way the meter works, so I wanted to share my opinion. I just wanted to make everyone aware of the existence of the meter so they can do their own research, just like I did. 


Ray N9RWC


 


------ Original Message ------
Received: 10:20 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "'N2MLP' n2mlp@... [070]" <070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: RE: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning


 

Why not use a VSA scope?

========================

de N2MLP Brian

Monroe County PA

cid:21CA93CE-AC8F-4FA3-8151-4E18E044767E@...

========================

From: 070@... [mailto:070@...] 
Sent: Friday, September 05, 2014 11:19 AM
To: 070@...
Subject: Re: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning

There is only one way to accurately determine your PSK signal quality. That
is with an IMD meter. 

Any IMD readings that you might get on the receiving end are inaccurate due
to the influence of other signals on the waterfall, S/N ratio, receiving
filters, etc. 

The IMD meter as designed by KK7UQ is a standalone wide-band HF receiver
that samples the PSK signal being broadcast by your antenna and
independently calculates the actual IMD reading. There is no physical
connection between the IMD meter and the radio or computer. 

There are several web sites that discuss the IMD meter by KK7UQ (Google "IMD
Meter"), but the only source for these meters currently is Jim Neutens KJ3N.
If you are interested, send Jim an email at Jim Nuytens
<jim.kj3n@...> and ask for current pricing and availability. The
meter comes fully assembled and calibrated. 

I got mine about a month ago for $139.95 plus Priority Mail shipping charges
and would never want to work PSK without it again. Initially, I thought of
it as a test instrument, but I now consider it to be an operating tool for
use any time I work PSK. 

It measures signals for PSK31 and PSK63, but not for PSK125. While that is
not inexpensive, it is well worth the money if PSK is your primary mode of
communication. I know it that it is the case for many 070 club members. 

When you transmit, the meter will immediately begin to measure your signal.
It will send both a visual and audio alarm if the IMD is below the standard.
For example, if you change frequency and forget to retune the antenna, the
SWR will be higher than normal and your signal quality will drop. The alarm
sounds and reminds me to retune the antenna. 

Also, if you need to run a little higher power than normal to reach a
distant station, or to bust a pileup, you can watch the IMD meter as you
increase power to determine how far you can go before your signal quality
deteriorates. Sending a high-power signal with poor signal quality is not
going to help you reach the other station. 

Of course, the IMD meter is an invaluable tool for setup of gain, power,
etc. One thing you will find is that the optimal setup for 20 meters 14.070
MHz might not be the optimal setup for other bands or frequencies, but
without the IMD meter, you would never be aware of the difference. 

I learned about the IMD meter from another ham whose credentials include
serving with NASA Mission Control for a number of the Gemini and Apollo
flights. Thus, I valued his opinion enough to make the investment in the
meter. I do not regret that decision. 

Ray N9RWC 

------ Original Message ------ 
Received: 09:39 AM CDT, 09/05/2014 
From: "shopr3@... [070] <mailto:shopr3@...%20[070]> "
<070@...> 
To: <070@...> 
Subject: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning 

Just had a nice Rag Chew with KD8GGN in ohio this morning he was/is looking
for critique on his signal quality. Sugested he might call cq 070 members
for some Elmers and some added info on the club. A chance for helping keep
ripple off the bands. Robert KD0FIP 1396 LONP 249 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









Matthew King - AK4MK
 

Oh, OK - I left out a biggie.  I set the wattage to full bore and use the TX OUT to modulate the signal up to whatever is needed for the contact, generally leaving it set to give me about 35-40 watts out.

I think it's great that we're all after clean signals, so I'm all about whatever works in that pursuit!

Matt
KK4CPS


On Fri, Sep 5, 2014 at 7:15 PM, Les Alverson kd4sfd2@... [070] <070@...> wrote:
 

I found that if I had little or no ALC movement, I was sending only a carrier, no information.  If I set the TX to were the ALC was about mid-way, my SWR meter showed about the wattage I had set the radio to.

LEs
k4lea 1746 lonp 272

On 9/5/2014 17:39, Matthew King mrk.twg@... [070] wrote:
 
I follow Les' setup, only a bit more strictly.  I set the TX Audio level on my Signalink to just below where the ALC moves.

There's actually variations from one end to the other of the waterfall and certainly across bands that require it to be reset, unless it is set very low to begin with.  Trying to "set it at 40w" and forget it is likely to lead to some splattering from time to time. Forget to tune the antenna when you switch bands?  Oh yeah, the ALC will tell you really quickly, even if your SWR doesn't get out of hand.

I've found with this method and my FTdx3000 and a tuned 20m antenna that I can run *95* watts with a very, very clean trace and no artifacts.  Of course that's gonna obliterate nearby stations so I don't do it, but it just goes to show with proper tuning of the antenna and a close eye on the ALC, that one can have a very clean signal.

I frequently get unsolicited reports like "wow, clean signal" and "sharpest signal on the waterfall" so I'm gonna stick with it!

I've heard nothing but good things about the meter in question, and given 150 bucks lying around, I just might order one!

Matt
KK4CPS


On Fri, Sep 5, 2014 at 5:24 PM, Les Alverson kd4sfd2@... [070] <070@...> wrote:
 

For me it was to watch my ALC (yeasu ft-857) to where it moved, but NOT pegged and adjust TX audio and gain.  With the signalink this has been a very easy process, although I wish I still had line in and line out capabilities.  I also keep an eye on the SWR meter.

Les
k4lea 1746 lonp 272

On 9/5/2014 16:24, Dan Morris dbmorris315@... [070] wrote:
 

Great information Ray.  Thanks for all that.  I myself will definitely look into one.


Dan Morris   KZ3T



On Sep 5, 2014, at 1:08 PM, 'Ray Clements' r.clements@... [070] <070@...> wrote:


It has been many years since I have used an oscilloscope. I would love to have one in my ham shack, but I do not have room for one, even one of the newer ones that no longer need a CRT. I am sure a scope would allow you to analyze a PSK signal and other signals as well. The IMD meter is limited to the analysis of PSK signals; an oscilloscope has far greater utility. That is why I suggested the IMD meter only for those whose primary mode of operatin is PSK.

If I had an oscilloscope, I would not purchase the IMD meter; but for anyone without one, the IMD meter is a great alternative.
You just plug in the power supply, extend the antenna and flip the switch to the on position and the mode switch to either PSK31, PSK63, or even Field Strength. There are no connection that need to be made to the radio.

The IMD meter takes up minimal space, so I can keep it in view of my operating position at all times. 
The IMD meter is easily portable and can be taken to remote operations such as APE or Field Day.
You can even add a battery connector and run it off a 9V battery if necessary for use on pontoon boat or picnic table expeditions.
 

I have absolutely no financial interest in the IMD meter. I was just impressed with the way the meter works, so I wanted to share my opinion. I just wanted to make everyone aware of the existence of the meter so they can do their own research, just like I did. 


Ray N9RWC


 


------ Original Message ------
Received: 10:20 AM CDT, 09/05/2014
From: "'N2MLP' n2mlp@... [070]" <070@...>
To: <070@...>
Subject: RE: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning


 

Why not use a VSA scope?

========================

de N2MLP Brian

Monroe County PA

cid:21CA93CE-AC8F-4FA3-8151-4E18E044767E@...

========================

From: 070@... [mailto:070@...] 
Sent: Friday, September 05, 2014 11:19 AM
To: 070@...
Subject: Re: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning

There is only one way to accurately determine your PSK signal quality. That
is with an IMD meter. 

Any IMD readings that you might get on the receiving end are inaccurate due
to the influence of other signals on the waterfall, S/N ratio, receiving
filters, etc. 

The IMD meter as designed by KK7UQ is a standalone wide-band HF receiver
that samples the PSK signal being broadcast by your antenna and
independently calculates the actual IMD reading. There is no physical
connection between the IMD meter and the radio or computer. 

There are several web sites that discuss the IMD meter by KK7UQ (Google "IMD
Meter"), but the only source for these meters currently is Jim Neutens KJ3N.
If you are interested, send Jim an email at Jim Nuytens
<jim.kj3n@...> and ask for current pricing and availability. The
meter comes fully assembled and calibrated. 

I got mine about a month ago for $139.95 plus Priority Mail shipping charges
and would never want to work PSK without it again. Initially, I thought of
it as a test instrument, but I now consider it to be an operating tool for
use any time I work PSK. 

It measures signals for PSK31 and PSK63, but not for PSK125. While that is
not inexpensive, it is well worth the money if PSK is your primary mode of
communication. I know it that it is the case for many 070 club members. 

When you transmit, the meter will immediately begin to measure your signal.
It will send both a visual and audio alarm if the IMD is below the standard.
For example, if you change frequency and forget to retune the antenna, the
SWR will be higher than normal and your signal quality will drop. The alarm
sounds and reminds me to retune the antenna. 

Also, if you need to run a little higher power than normal to reach a
distant station, or to bust a pileup, you can watch the IMD meter as you
increase power to determine how far you can go before your signal quality
deteriorates. Sending a high-power signal with poor signal quality is not
going to help you reach the other station. 

Of course, the IMD meter is an invaluable tool for setup of gain, power,
etc. One thing you will find is that the optimal setup for 20 meters 14.070
MHz might not be the optimal setup for other bands or frequencies, but
without the IMD meter, you would never be aware of the difference. 

I learned about the IMD meter from another ham whose credentials include
serving with NASA Mission Control for a number of the Gemini and Apollo
flights. Thus, I valued his opinion enough to make the investment in the
meter. I do not regret that decision. 

Ray N9RWC 

------ Original Message ------ 
Received: 09:39 AM CDT, 09/05/2014 
From: "shopr3@... [070] <mailto:shopr3@...%20[070]> "
<070@...> 
To: <070@...> 
Subject: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning 

Just had a nice Rag Chew with KD8GGN in ohio this morning he was/is looking
for critique on his signal quality. Sugested he might call cq 070 members
for some Elmers and some added info on the club. A chance for helping keep
ripple off the bands. Robert KD0FIP 1396 LONP 249 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]










Bill Garwood
 

When I started using PSK-31 last year, I would get an occasional complaint about my signal, usually from Mr. Anonymous. This only happened on 20 meters and always in the late afternoon. I did the usual stuff, checked ALC, power out etc. I would finish up a QSO with a station that would compliment my nice signal then bam..here would come the complainer and I had not touched a thing on my station. I did some research and bought one of the KK7UQ IMD meters. It confirmed that my signal was OK and the IMD was usually -34 to -32 dB leaving here. What I think was happening was my antenna and the propagation combined to really put out a strong signal into some area in the afternoon and that was strong enough to swamp Mr. Anonymous' receiver. NVIS? I was using a TS-680 with Signalink and running about 25 watts. I have more recently acquired a TS-590 which is USB controlled and the Signalink and TS-680 are in semi-retirement.

I have experimented on a dead band and I can operate up to 80 watts on all HF bands with the TS-590 and still have a good IMD value of around -28 dB or better as per the IMD meter. I do not normally use anywhere near that power but I did operate with 75 watts one time on 160 meters when the other station asked me to power up a bit. I've tried turning up the ALC to see what would happen and sure enough, the IMD drops to something like -15 dB and the beeper and red warning light were going crazy on the IMD meter.

I keep the IMD meter plugged in and handy but I do not leave it on as it has a beeper that goes off randomly when I am in receive. In the middle of the night, it can be heard all over the house when everything else is quiet. I need to add a toggle switch to turn off the beeper and then leave the IMD meter on all of the time.

Oh, I still, maybe every two or three months, get one of those complaints when on 20 meters in the afternoon but I check my trusty meter and continue on. Distortion in PSK signals are not always due to a fault at the transmitting station but can be caused by improper receiver operation and/or propagation. My old 680 only has the SSB filter and a strong PSK signal nearby can swamp the waterfall with all sorts of traces. Adjusting the RF gain and/or attenuator helped in some situations. I don't have nearly as much trouble receiving with nearby strong stations with the TS-590 and the great roofing filter.

See y'all on 80 meters in the contest. Let me know if my signal needs adjusting. 😏

73,

Bill N4GBK

To: 070@yahoogroups.com
From: 070@yahoogroups.com
Date: Fri, 5 Sep 2014 19:22:57 -0400
Subject: Re: [070] kd8ggn needs help with his trace on 20M this morning


























Oh, OK - I left out a biggie. I set the wattage to full bore and use the TX OUT to modulate the signal up to whatever is needed for the contact, generally leaving it set to give me about 35-40 watts out.
I think it's great that we're all after clean signals, so I'm all about whatever works in that pursuit!
MattKK4CPS

On Fri, Sep 5, 2014 at 7:15 PM, Les Alverson kd4sfd2@gmail.com [070] <070@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




























I found that if I had little or no ALC movement, I was sending only
a carrier, no information. If I set the TX to were the ALC was
about mid-way, my SWR meter showed about the wattage I had set the
radio to.



LEs

k4lea 1746 lonp 272


On 9/5/2014 17:39, Matthew King
mrk.twg@gmail.com [070] wrote:





I follow Les' setup, only a bit more
strictly. I set the TX Audio level on my Signalink to just
below where the ALC moves.



There's actually variations from one end to the other
of the waterfall and certainly across bands that require
it to be reset, unless it is set very low to begin with.
Trying to "set it at 40w" and forget it is likely to
lead to some splattering from time to time. Forget to
tune the antenna when you switch bands? Oh yeah, the
ALC will tell you really quickly, even if your SWR
doesn't get out of hand.



I've found with this method and my FTdx3000 and a
tuned 20m antenna that I can run *95* watts with a very,
very clean trace and no artifacts. Of course that's
gonna obliterate nearby stations so I don't do it, but
it just goes to show with proper tuning of the antenna
and a close eye on the ALC, that one can have a very
clean signal.



I frequently get unsolicited reports like "wow, clean
signal" and "sharpest signal on the waterfall" so I'm
gonna stick with it!



I've heard nothing but good things about the meter in
question, and given 150 bucks lying around, I just might
order one!



Matt
KK4CPS





On Fri, Sep 5, 2014 at 5:24 PM,
Les Alverson kd4sfd2@gmail.com
[070] <070@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:







For me it was to watch my ALC (yeasu
ft-857) to where it moved, but NOT pegged
and adjust TX audio and gain. With the
signalink this has been a very easy process,
although I wish I still had line in and line
out capabilities. I also keep an eye on the
SWR meter.



Les

k4lea 1746 lonp 272



On 9/5/2014 16:24, Dan Morris dbmorris315@gmail.com
[070] wrote:




Great information Ray. Thanks for all
that. I myself will definitely look
into one.






Dan Morris KZ3T
dbmorris315@gmail.com









On Sep 5, 2014, at 1:08 PM, 'Ray
Clements' r.clements@usa.net
[070] <070@yahoogroups.com>

wrote:










It
has been many years since I
have used an oscilloscope. I would love to have one in my ham
shack, but I do not have
room for one, even one of
the newer ones that no
longer need a CRT. I
am sure a scope would allow
you to analyze a PSK signal
and other signals as well.
The IMD meter is limited to
the analysis of PSK signals;
an oscilloscope has far
greater utility. That is why
I suggested the IMD meter
only for those whose primary
mode of operatin is PSK.





If
I had an oscilloscope,
I would not purchase
the IMD meter; but for
anyone without one,
the IMD meter is a
great alternative.
You
just plug in the power
supply, extend the
antenna and flip the
switch to the on
position and the mode
switch to either
PSK31, PSK63, or even
Field Strength. There
are no connection that
need to be made to the
radio.




The IMD meter takes
up minimal space, so I
can keep it in view of
my operating position at
all times.
The

IMD meter is easily
portable and can be
taken to remote
operations such as
APE or Field Day.
You

can even add a
battery connector
and run it off a 9V
battery if necessary
for use on pontoon
boat or picnic table
expeditions.




I have absolutely
no financial interest
in the IMD meter. I
was just impressed
with the way the meter
works, so I wanted to
share my opinion. I just wanted to make everyone
aware of the
existence of the
meter so they can do their own research, just like I did.






Ray

N9RWC












------
Original Message
------

Received: 10:20

AM CDT, 09/05/2014

From: "'N2MLP' n2mlp@verizon.net [070]"

<070@yahoogroups.com>

To: <070@yahoogroups.com>

Subject: RE:

[070] kd8ggn needs
help with his trace
on 20M this morning







Why
not use a VSA
scope?



========================



de N2MLP Brian



Monroe County
PA



cid:21CA93CE-AC8F-4FA3-8151-4E18E044767E@comcast.net



========================



From: 070@yahoogroups.com [mailto:070@yahoogroups.com]

Sent: Friday,
September 05,
2014 11:19 AM

To: 070@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re:
[070] kd8ggn
needs help
with his trace
on 20M this
morning



There is only
one way to
accurately
determine your
PSK signal
quality. That

is with an IMD
meter.



Any IMD
readings that
you might get
on the
receiving end
are inaccurate
due

to the
influence of
other signals
on the
waterfall, S/N
ratio,
receiving

filters, etc.



The IMD meter
as designed by
KK7UQ is a
standalone
wide-band HF
receiver

that samples
the PSK signal
being
broadcast by
your antenna
and

independently
calculates the
actual IMD
reading. There
is no physical

connection
between the
IMD meter and
the radio or
computer.



There are
several web
sites that
discuss the
IMD meter by
KK7UQ (Google
"IMD

Meter"), but
the only
source for
these meters
currently is
Jim Neutens
KJ3N.

If you are
interested,
send Jim an
email at Jim
Nuytens

<jim.kj3n@verizon.net>

and ask for
current
pricing and
availability.
The

meter comes
fully
assembled and
calibrated.



I got mine
about a month
ago for
$139.95 plus
Priority Mail
shipping
charges

and would
never want to
work PSK
without it
again.
Initially, I
thought of

it as a test
instrument,
but I now
consider it to
be an
operating tool
for

use any time I
work PSK.



It measures
signals for
PSK31 and
PSK63, but not
for PSK125.
While that is

not
inexpensive,
it is well
worth the
money if PSK
is your
primary mode
of

communication.
I know it that
it is the case
for many 070
club members.



When you
transmit, the
meter will
immediately
begin to
measure your
signal.

It will send
both a visual
and audio
alarm if the
IMD is below
the standard.

For example,
if you change
frequency and
forget to
retune the
antenna, the

SWR will be
higher than
normal and
your signal
quality will
drop. The
alarm

sounds and
reminds me to
retune the
antenna.



Also, if you
need to run a
little higher
power than
normal to
reach a

distant
station, or to
bust a pileup,
you can watch
the IMD meter
as you

increase power
to determine
how far you
can go before
your signal
quality

deteriorates.
Sending a
high-power
signal with
poor signal
quality is not

going to help
you reach the
other station.



Of course, the
IMD meter is
an invaluable
tool for setup
of gain,
power,

etc. One thing
you will find
is that the
optimal setup
for 20 meters
14.070

MHz might not
be the optimal
setup for
other bands or
frequencies,
but

without the
IMD meter, you
would never be
aware of the
difference.



I learned
about the IMD
meter from
another ham
whose
credentials
include

serving with
NASA Mission
Control for a
number of the
Gemini and
Apollo

flights. Thus,
I valued his
opinion enough
to make the
investment in
the

meter. I do
not regret
that decision.



Ray N9RWC



------
Original
Message ------

Received:
09:39 AM CDT,
09/05/2014

From: "shopr3@yahoo.com [070]

<mailto:shopr3@yahoo.com%20[070]>

"

<070@yahoogroups.com>

To: <070@yahoogroups.com>

Subject: [070]
kd8ggn needs
help with his
trace on 20M
this morning



Just had a
nice Rag Chew
with KD8GGN in
ohio this
morning he
was/is looking

for critique
on his signal
quality.
Sugested he
might call cq
070 members

for some
Elmers and
some added
info on the
club. A chance
for helping
keep

ripple off the
bands. Robert
KD0FIP 1396
LONP 249



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portions of
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have been
removed]