local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA


Brian (N2MLP)
 

Their vhf contest handbook

If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)

No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz

 

This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about

 

http://www.packratvhf.com/index.php/technical-articles/29-pack-rat-camelback-contest-handbook

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 


W7RIV
 

The local clubs here in Utah that are primarily 2m, 70cm, and VHF really are not HF folks. There is a huge disparity between the HF/DX Clubs and the other clubs. I've not done any VHF myself, but what is a typical power range they will be operating in? 2m/70cm unless using something special is typically 2 - 5 Watts. SO if they were running HP, why would it matter?

Bryon, W7RIV

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 2:32 PM Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...> wrote:

Their vhf contest handbook

If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)

No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz

 

This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about

 

http://www.packratvhf.com/index.php/technical-articles/29-pack-rat-camelback-contest-handbook

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 


Brian (N2MLP)
 

They run about 2K in to large beams stacked in groups of 4 to 8 beam sit on top of Local Mountain with auto cq’ers going complete contest

 

No of the local’s can  think about putting a station up for the June VHF contest

 

Very rude operators

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 

From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of W7RIV
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 5:18 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

 

The local clubs here in Utah that are primarily 2m, 70cm, and VHF really are not HF folks. There is a huge disparity between the HF/DX Clubs and the other clubs. I've not done any VHF myself, but what is a typical power range they will be operating in? 2m/70cm unless using something special is typically 2 - 5 Watts. SO if they were running HP, why would it matter?

 

Bryon, W7RIV

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 2:32 PM Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...> wrote:

Their vhf contest handbook

If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)

No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz

 

This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about

 

http://www.packratvhf.com/index.php/technical-articles/29-pack-rat-camelback-contest-handbook

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 


Stephen Melachrinos
 

They have to. It's their only chance to beat out W2SZ.

:-)

Seriously, though, how many of us adjust our power to "the minimum practical to make a QSO" when we're operating in a contest? Last weekend, I decided I'd operate in the Low Power category for the 070 Firecracker Sprint, set the power at 25 watts, and didn't think about it again even though I'm sure I could have made many of those QSOs with less than 10 watts. I presume those in the Medium and High Power categories did the same. They're in a contest in an unlimited power category, so using big amps makes sense. 

Steve
W3HF
(W2SZ alumnus)

(And FWIW, the PackRats haven't been competitive with the MGEF since the mid-1970s.) 






-----Original Message-----
From: Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...>
To: 070Club <070Club@groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Jul 16, 2018 4:32 pm
Subject: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

Their vhf contest handbook
If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)
No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz
 
This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about
 
 
 
========================
         de N2MLP Brian
       Monroe County PA
 
 
========================
 
 


Brian (N2MLP)
 

Just think it rude to travel and transmit and powerful crap signal every vhf contest

 

Contacting the state on why local ham can’t get access to the same state park  and let them find something in there area

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 

From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Stephen Melachrinos
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 6:35 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

 

They have to. It's their only chance to beat out W2SZ.

 

:-)

 

Seriously, though, how many of us adjust our power to "the minimum practical to make a QSO" when we're operating in a contest? Last weekend, I decided I'd operate in the Low Power category for the 070 Firecracker Sprint, set the power at 25 watts, and didn't think about it again even though I'm sure I could have made many of those QSOs with less than 10 watts. I presume those in the Medium and High Power categories did the same. They're in a contest in an unlimited power category, so using big amps makes sense. 

 

Steve

W3HF

(W2SZ alumnus)

 

(And FWIW, the PackRats haven't been competitive with the MGEF since the mid-1970s.) 

 

 

 



-----Original Message-----
From: Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...>
To: 070Club <070Club@groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Jul 16, 2018 4:32 pm
Subject: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

Their vhf contest handbook

If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)

No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz

 

This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about

 

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 


Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

I skimmed the document you linked and it looks to me like they’ve been mounting this operation at that location yearly since the 1990’s.  Based on that and some of the technical discussion in the document I would venture a guess that most of the participants are not newly licensed.  So I confess I’m not sure how this relates to being what new hams are all about, as it seems to me to indicate that this has pretty much *always* been what *some* hams are all about.  As with pretty much any pastime, it seems to me like older hams spend a great deal of time lamenting how perfectly rotten ‘new’ hams are, sometimes with some justification and sometimes with none.  

It seems reasonably likely that when the third amateur radio license was issued, the next QSO between the first ham and the second ham consisted of bellyaching about what a lid the new ham was.  Human nature I suppose, but it’s not the way to grow the hobby and improve the quality of the amateur radio experience for everyone.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:32 PM, Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...> wrote:

Their vhf contest handbook
If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)
No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz
 
This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about
 
 
 
========================
         de N2MLP Brian
       Monroe County PA
 
 
<image001.jpg>
========================
 
 


Jerry N9AVY
 

Tossing gasoline on the fire ....  they should bring back the CW requirement  .   

Jerry   N9AVY


From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 7:02 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

I skimmed the document you linked and it looks to me like they’ve been mounting this operation at that location yearly since the 1990’s.  Based on that and some of the technical discussion in the document I would venture a guess that most of the participants are not newly licensed.  So I confess I’m not sure how this relates to being what new hams are all about, as it seems to me to indicate that this has pretty much *always* been what *some* hams are all about.  As with pretty much any pastime, it seems to me like older hams spend a great deal of time lamenting how perfectly rotten ‘new’ hams are, sometimes with some justification and sometimes with none.  

It seems reasonably likely that when the third amateur radio license was issued, the next QSO between the first ham and the second ham consisted of bellyaching about what a lid the new ham was.  Human nature I suppose, but it’s not the way to grow the hobby and improve the quality of the amateur radio experience for everyone.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:32 PM, Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...> wrote:

Their vhf contest handbook
If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)
No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz
 
This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about
 
 
 
========================
         de N2MLP Brian
       Monroe County PA
 
 
<image001.jpg>
========================
 
 




Brian (N2MLP)
 

It’s a old group but most of the old hams don’t go up on a mountain and camp   they send a newbie’s

Went up to their location once 

Rude rude rude reported the drinking to ranger’s who spoke to them

 

Not stating all new ham’s are bad     but it’s the 1% that get noticed

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 

From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 8:02 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

 

I skimmed the document you linked and it looks to me like they’ve been mounting this operation at that location yearly since the 1990’s.  Based on that and some of the technical discussion in the document I would venture a guess that most of the participants are not newly licensed.  So I confess I’m not sure how this relates to being what new hams are all about, as it seems to me to indicate that this has pretty much *always* been what *some* hams are all about.  As with pretty much any pastime, it seems to me like older hams spend a great deal of time lamenting how perfectly rotten ‘new’ hams are, sometimes with some justification and sometimes with none.  

 

It seems reasonably likely that when the third amateur radio license was issued, the next QSO between the first ham and the second ham consisted of bellyaching about what a lid the new ham was.  Human nature I suppose, but it’s not the way to grow the hobby and improve the quality of the amateur radio experience for everyone.

 

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

 

On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:32 PM, Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...> wrote:

 

Their vhf contest handbook

If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)

No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz

 

This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about

 

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

<image001.jpg>

========================

 

 

 


Brian (N2MLP)
 

Hard to memorize  if you can’t know what their sending in advance

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 

From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jerry N9AVY
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 8:09 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

 

Tossing gasoline on the fire ....  they should bring back the CW requirement  .   


Jerry   N9AVY


From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 7:02 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

 

I skimmed the document you linked and it looks to me like they’ve been mounting this operation at that location yearly since the 1990’s.  Based on that and some of the technical discussion in the document I would venture a guess that most of the participants are not newly licensed.  So I confess I’m not sure how this relates to being what new hams are all about, as it seems to me to indicate that this has pretty much *always* been what *some* hams are all about.  As with pretty much any pastime, it seems to me like older hams spend a great deal of time lamenting how perfectly rotten ‘new’ hams are, sometimes with some justification and sometimes with none.  

 

It seems reasonably likely that when the third amateur radio license was issued, the next QSO between the first ham and the second ham consisted of bellyaching about what a lid the new ham was.  Human nature I suppose, but it’s not the way to grow the hobby and improve the quality of the amateur radio experience for everyone.

 

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

 

On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:32 PM, Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...> wrote:

 

Their vhf contest handbook

If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)

No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz

 

This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about

 

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

<image001.jpg>

========================

 

 

 

 


Jerry N9AVY
 

First Novice in 1977 ( 9 months) , Tech in 1978 (8 months)- 5 wpm...   General in 1979 (1 month) and finally Advanced  at 22 WPM... Then Extra in 2000 with 13 wpm.     Problem was the lapse from 1979 to 2000 when I operated SSB only.  The ARRL Triple play in 2009 got me back to CW. Still somewhat of a hack at CW , but am able to copy what I need to at 28 wpm and maybe a bit faster.    

The biggest problem was get to copy 5 wpm with accuracy and the fact that I had spent (wasted) 18 years of my life trying to learn CW.  Went to code classes at 2 different places and still couldn't get it.  Finally in 1977 I met my Elmer and he encouraged me to learn enough code to get 5 wpm ticket.  Never, ever thought I would ever get beyond the 5 wpm Novice ticket. No one was more surprised than me !

If I can do it so can anyone else !   People just need to be motivated.  CW is learnable.

Oh yeah,  I still most copy call signs and RST at 28 wpm.  The rest is rough, but at least I try to get enough to get a QSO out of it.

Jerry  N9AVY





From: Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 8:33 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

Hard to memorize  if you can’t know what their sending in advance
 
========================
         de N2MLP Brian
       Monroe County PA
 
 
========================
 
 
From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jerry N9AVY
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 8:09 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA
 
Tossing gasoline on the fire ....  they should bring back the CW requirement  .   

Jerry   N9AVY

From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 7:02 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA
 
I skimmed the document you linked and it looks to me like they’ve been mounting this operation at that location yearly since the 1990’s.  Based on that and some of the technical discussion in the document I would venture a guess that most of the participants are not newly licensed.  So I confess I’m not sure how this relates to being what new hams are all about, as it seems to me to indicate that this has pretty much *always* been what *some* hams are all about.  As with pretty much any pastime, it seems to me like older hams spend a great deal of time lamenting how perfectly rotten ‘new’ hams are, sometimes with some justification and sometimes with none.  
 
It seems reasonably likely that when the third amateur radio license was issued, the next QSO between the first ham and the second ham consisted of bellyaching about what a lid the new ham was.  Human nature I suppose, but it’s not the way to grow the hobby and improve the quality of the amateur radio experience for everyone.
 
-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!
 
On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:32 PM, Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...> wrote:
 
Their vhf contest handbook
If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)
No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz
 
This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about
 
 
 
========================
         de N2MLP Brian
       Monroe County PA
 
 
<image001.jpg>
========================
 
 
 
 



Brian (N2MLP)
 

Yep  just need to want to do it

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 

From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jerry N9AVY
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:03 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

 

First Novice in 1977 ( 9 months) , Tech in 1978 (8 months)- 5 wpm...   General in 1979 (1 month) and finally Advanced  at 22 WPM... Then Extra in 2000 with 13 wpm.     Problem was the lapse from 1979 to 2000 when I operated SSB only.  The ARRL Triple play in 2009 got me back to CW. Still somewhat of a hack at CW , but am able to copy what I need to at 28 wpm and maybe a bit faster.    

 

The biggest problem was get to copy 5 wpm with accuracy and the fact that I had spent (wasted) 18 years of my life trying to learn CW.  Went to code classes at 2 different places and still couldn't get it.  Finally in 1977 I met my Elmer and he encouraged me to learn enough code to get 5 wpm ticket.  Never, ever thought I would ever get beyond the 5 wpm Novice ticket. No one was more surprised than me !

 

If I can do it so can anyone else !   People just need to be motivated.  CW is learnable.

 

Oh yeah,  I still most copy call signs and RST at 28 wpm.  The rest is rough, but at least I try to get enough to get a QSO out of it.

 

Jerry  N9AVY

 

 

 


From: Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 8:33 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

 

Hard to memorize  if you can’t know what their sending in advance

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 

From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jerry N9AVY
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 8:09 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

 

Tossing gasoline on the fire ....  they should bring back the CW requirement  .   


Jerry   N9AVY


From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 7:02 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

 

I skimmed the document you linked and it looks to me like they’ve been mounting this operation at that location yearly since the 1990’s.  Based on that and some of the technical discussion in the document I would venture a guess that most of the participants are not newly licensed.  So I confess I’m not sure how this relates to being what new hams are all about, as it seems to me to indicate that this has pretty much *always* been what *some* hams are all about.  As with pretty much any pastime, it seems to me like older hams spend a great deal of time lamenting how perfectly rotten ‘new’ hams are, sometimes with some justification and sometimes with none.  

 

It seems reasonably likely that when the third amateur radio license was issued, the next QSO between the first ham and the second ham consisted of bellyaching about what a lid the new ham was.  Human nature I suppose, but it’s not the way to grow the hobby and improve the quality of the amateur radio experience for everyone.

 

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

 

On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:32 PM, Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...> wrote:

 

Their vhf contest handbook

If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)

No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz

 

This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about

 

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

<image001.jpg>

========================

 

 

 

 

 


Jerry N9AVY
 

Few seem to have the motivation to go that way.   Many PSK Q's in last year or so have been name , State, and 599 and then nothing - sad.



From: Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 9:16 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

Yep  just need to want to do it
 
========================
         de N2MLP Brian
       Monroe County PA
 
 
========================
 
 
From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jerry N9AVY
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:03 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA
 
First Novice in 1977 ( 9 months) , Tech in 1978 (8 months)- 5 wpm...   General in 1979 (1 month) and finally Advanced  at 22 WPM... Then Extra in 2000 with 13 wpm.     Problem was the lapse from 1979 to 2000 when I operated SSB only.  The ARRL Triple play in 2009 got me back to CW. Still somewhat of a hack at CW , but am able to copy what I need to at 28 wpm and maybe a bit faster.    
 
The biggest problem was get to copy 5 wpm with accuracy and the fact that I had spent (wasted) 18 years of my life trying to learn CW.  Went to code classes at 2 different places and still couldn't get it.  Finally in 1977 I met my Elmer and he encouraged me to learn enough code to get 5 wpm ticket.  Never, ever thought I would ever get beyond the 5 wpm Novice ticket. No one was more surprised than me !
 
If I can do it so can anyone else !   People just need to be motivated.  CW is learnable.
 
Oh yeah,  I still most copy call signs and RST at 28 wpm.  The rest is rough, but at least I try to get enough to get a QSO out of it.
 
Jerry  N9AVY
 
 
 

From: Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 8:33 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA
 
Hard to memorize  if you can’t know what their sending in advance
 
========================
         de N2MLP Brian
       Monroe County PA
 
 
========================
 
 
From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jerry N9AVY
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 8:09 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA
 
Tossing gasoline on the fire ....  they should bring back the CW requirement  .   

Jerry   N9AVY

From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 7:02 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA
 
I skimmed the document you linked and it looks to me like they’ve been mounting this operation at that location yearly since the 1990’s.  Based on that and some of the technical discussion in the document I would venture a guess that most of the participants are not newly licensed.  So I confess I’m not sure how this relates to being what new hams are all about, as it seems to me to indicate that this has pretty much *always* been what *some* hams are all about.  As with pretty much any pastime, it seems to me like older hams spend a great deal of time lamenting how perfectly rotten ‘new’ hams are, sometimes with some justification and sometimes with none.  
 
It seems reasonably likely that when the third amateur radio license was issued, the next QSO between the first ham and the second ham consisted of bellyaching about what a lid the new ham was.  Human nature I suppose, but it’s not the way to grow the hobby and improve the quality of the amateur radio experience for everyone.
 
-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!
 
On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:32 PM, Brian (N2MLP) <n2mlp@...> wrote:
 
Their vhf contest handbook
If you read thought it tells there operators to run max power it all time   (they have the widest nosiest signals)
No other stations in this area can think about trying and freq about 50Mhz
 
This is just written proof of what the new hams are all about
 
 
 
========================
         de N2MLP Brian
       Monroe County PA
 
 
<image001.jpg>
========================
 
 
 
 
 



Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 


On Jul 16, 2018, at 7:03 PM, Jerry N9AVY <n9avy@...> wrote:

If I can do it so can anyone else !   People just need to be motivated.  CW is learnable.

CW is indeed learnable.  After many, many frustrating abortive efforts I took a new tack in October, and I can fairly reliably copy at 12 wpm now, and I’m working on speed.

The problem I had for years was thinking that CW was something I needed to learn in the same sense as learning calculus - just sit down and study until you get the concepts down and know how to apply them.  It’s not mathematics or history.  For me, anyway, learning at 5 wpm, decoding the dits and dahs, and thinking “hmm three dits and a dah, that’s, um, a V!” was a repeated dead end.

In the end, for me, it’s been about training a reflex.  If someone is interested in trying what I’ve done, go to lcwo.net and create an account.  There’s a tool there called ‘morse machine’, which will help you recognize the sound of each letter without ever breaking it down into dits and dahs.  Set the letter speed to 15-18 wpm, and this web app will introduce letters one at a time.  For me, that tool was the key to eliminating the frustration.

Remember, you’re training a reflex, not ‘learning’.  It’s not a matter of being smart or stupid, it’s a matter of enough training time to set the patterns in your brain.  Be patient with yourself.

lcwo.net has a whole bunch of different tools - random drills, plaintext drills, you name it.  It’s a tremendous resource for anyone who wants to learn CW, and it’s free free free.

I’m convinced that if anyone who can commit to 15 minutes a day will make steady progress.  It’s worked for me.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!


Jerry N9AVY
 

Paul:

You comments are right on.  If everyone went about learning code this way it wouldn't be so painful.  When I ran code classes for local club I tried to get these point across, but they mostly fell on deaf ears.  All they wanted was to get behind a microphone !

Learning the mechanics of the code never became so obvious as when I sent my Novice call "WD9HQQ"  and it came back from other Novices as "WD9SYY" ... aaaaarrrrgggghhhhh   !

Jerry n9avy


From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 9:09 AM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA


On Jul 16, 2018, at 7:03 PM, Jerry N9AVY <n9avy@...> wrote:

If I can do it so can anyone else !   People just need to be motivated.  CW is learnable.

CW is indeed learnable.  After many, many frustrating abortive efforts I took a new tack in October, and I can fairly reliably copy at 12 wpm now, and I’m working on speed.

The problem I had for years was thinking that CW was something I needed to learn in the same sense as learning calculus - just sit down and study until you get the concepts down and know how to apply them.  It’s not mathematics or history.  For me, anyway, learning at 5 wpm, decoding the dits and dahs, and thinking “hmm three dits and a dah, that’s, um, a V!” was a repeated dead end.

In the end, for me, it’s been about training a reflex.  If someone is interested in trying what I’ve done, go to lcwo.net and create an account.  There’s a tool there called ‘morse machine’, which will help you recognize the sound of each letter without ever breaking it down into dits and dahs.  Set the letter speed to 15-18 wpm, and this web app will introduce letters one at a time.  For me, that tool was the key to eliminating the frustration.

Remember, you’re training a reflex, not ‘learning’.  It’s not a matter of being smart or stupid, it’s a matter of enough training time to set the patterns in your brain.  Be patient with yourself.

lcwo.net has a whole bunch of different tools - random drills, plaintext drills, you name it.  It’s a tremendous resource for anyone who wants to learn CW, and it’s free free free.

I’m convinced that if anyone who can commit to 15 minutes a day will make steady progress.  It’s worked for me.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!




David, K9DWR
 

lcwo.net is a GREAT tool. And yes, this is a muscle memory thing, not a concept thing. There’s no substitute for repetition. It’s the same as your golf swing, or touch typing, or anything else that is a physical task. You just have to put the time in.


David, K9DWR
#1604 LONP #255
david@graniteweb.com

On Jul 17, 2018, at 13:23, Jerry N9AVY <n9avy@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Paul:

You comments are right on. If everyone went about learning code this way it wouldn't be so painful. When I ran code classes for local club I tried to get these point across, but they mostly fell on deaf ears. All they wanted was to get behind a microphone !

Learning the mechanics of the code never became so obvious as when I sent my Novice call "WD9HQQ" and it came back from other Novices as "WD9SYY" ... aaaaarrrrgggghhhhh !

Jerry n9avy
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@butzi.net>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 9:09 AM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA


On Jul 16, 2018, at 7:03 PM, Jerry N9AVY <n9avy@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

If I can do it so can anyone else ! People just need to be motivated. CW is learnable.
CW is indeed learnable. After many, many frustrating abortive efforts I took a new tack in October, and I can fairly reliably copy at 12 wpm now, and I’m working on speed.

The problem I had for years was thinking that CW was something I needed to learn in the same sense as learning calculus - just sit down and study until you get the concepts down and know how to apply them. It’s not mathematics or history. For me, anyway, learning at 5 wpm, decoding the dits and dahs, and thinking “hmm three dits and a dah, that’s, um, a V!” was a repeated dead end.

In the end, for me, it’s been about training a reflex. If someone is interested in trying what I’ve done, go to lcwo.net and create an account. There’s a tool there called ‘morse machine’, which will help you recognize the sound of each letter without ever breaking it down into dits and dahs. Set the letter speed to 15-18 wpm, and this web app will introduce letters one at a time. For me, that tool was the key to eliminating the frustration.

Remember, you’re training a reflex, not ‘learning’. It’s not a matter of being smart or stupid, it’s a matter of enough training time to set the patterns in your brain. Be patient with yourself.

lcwo.net has a whole bunch of different tools - random drills, plaintext drills, you name it. It’s a tremendous resource for anyone who wants to learn CW, and it’s free free free.


John Hendry KG5OIB
 

I'll give it a try.   Code has always been my Waterloo.   I've been told its a left brain vs right brain thing, and that its exceptionally difficult for those who are left handed to be able to learn code.  

something about processing time in the brain being slower for some things.  

John
KG5OIB


David, K9DWR
 

I’m a lefty, and successfully learned code for my Commercial marine license back in 1992. I don’t recall it being all that hard, but again, that was a focused class with a lot of repetition and practice.


David

On Jul 18, 2018, at 09:46, John Hendry <archer@archercom.net> wrote:

I'll give it a try. Code has always been my Waterloo. I've been told its a left brain vs right brain thing, and that its exceptionally difficult for those who are left handed to be able to learn code.

something about processing time in the brain being slower for some things.

John
KG5OIB


Jerry N9AVY
 

John:

They do make left handed keys.  Really, check out Vibroplex and they have semi-automatic keys both right & left.  
Don't think it's a matter of being being left or right handed.  As Paul said, it's a muscle memory thing.  

Jerry  N9AVY



From: John Hendry <archer@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 9:46 AM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

I'll give it a try.   Code has always been my Waterloo.   I've been told its a left brain vs right brain thing, and that its exceptionally difficult for those who are left handed to be able to learn code.  

something about processing time in the brain being slower for some things.  

John
KG5OIB



W7RIV
 

I started doing coding. I'm a newb to the hobbie and I didn't have to learn it. I didn't want to learn it. Once I found out I didn't need to do CW I went and looked up when they were testing, there happened to be a test the next day. I went and passed the Tech/General exams after an evening of study. I didn't pass the Extra on such short notice. I couldn't make it to the test in Sept, and passed Extra in October. Once I got into ham radio and started to do more with HF, I was  hooked. I then wanted to learn CW. I can send like a champion. I have issues hearing and get caught up on the parts I've missed. What I was using, I really liked it. But, I think it does require 2x 15 minute sessions a day.  



I love CW just like I love data modes. I'm not a huge fan of the SSB side and lots of talking. I like to see how far I can get, and with how little of power.

Bryon, W7RIV



On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 10:58 AM Jerry N9AVY <n9avy@...> wrote:
John:

They do make left handed keys.  Really, check out Vibroplex and they have semi-automatic keys both right & left.  
Don't think it's a matter of being being left or right handed.  As Paul said, it's a muscle memory thing.  

Jerry  N9AVY



From: John Hendry <archer@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 9:46 AM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

I'll give it a try.   Code has always been my Waterloo.   I've been told its a left brain vs right brain thing, and that its exceptionally difficult for those who are left handed to be able to learn code.  

something about processing time in the brain being slower for some things.  

John
KG5OIB



Jerry N9AVY
 

The thing is ...  you don't HAVE to learn code,  you GET to...



From: W7RIV <nnegrom@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

I started doing coding. I'm a newb to the hobbie and I didn't have to learn it. I didn't want to learn it. Once I found out I didn't need to do CW I went and looked up when they were testing, there happened to be a test the next day. I went and passed the Tech/General exams after an evening of study. I didn't pass the Extra on such short notice. I couldn't make it to the test in Sept, and passed Extra in October. Once I got into ham radio and started to do more with HF, I was  hooked. I then wanted to learn CW. I can send like a champion. I have issues hearing and get caught up on the parts I've missed. What I was using, I really liked it. But, I think it does require 2x 15 minute sessions a day.  



I love CW just like I love data modes. I'm not a huge fan of the SSB side and lots of talking. I like to see how far I can get, and with how little of power.

Bryon, W7RIV



On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 10:58 AM Jerry N9AVY <n9avy@...> wrote:
John:

They do make left handed keys.  Really, check out Vibroplex and they have semi-automatic keys both right & left.  
Don't think it's a matter of being being left or right handed.  As Paul said, it's a muscle memory thing.  

Jerry  N9AVY



From: John Hendry <archer@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 9:46 AM
Subject: Re: [070Club] local VHF GROUP IN MY AREA

I'll give it a try.   Code has always been my Waterloo.   I've been told its a left brain vs right brain thing, and that its exceptionally difficult for those who are left handed to be able to learn code.  

something about processing time in the brain being slower for some things.  

John
KG5OIB