Topics

Band Plan


Steve VA3FLF/KM4FLF
 

I am doing a little studying for my prep on Ham radio Now, I was looking at the band plan issue, and discovered that the band plan doesnt specifically mention where each mode is to be used in the bands. For example, 20M has 14.070 14.095 says RTTY, however IARU describes it as narrow band digital.

Then it discusses a "gentlemen's agreement for suggested frequencies and had 14.070 as PSK. Exactly who and when was this gentlemens agreement made?

Any background would be helpful.

Thanks,

Steve VA3FLF
2301


Stephen Melachrinos
 

Steve -

Any agreement has to start with someone making a suggestion, and others "agreeing" with it. As more pile on, the agreement becomes more prevalent. And eventually (hopefully) it becomes pervasive.

(Note: a "gentleman's agreement" simply means there's no legal imperative, only that well-behaved gentlemen agree to follow it.)

The earliest published reference I can find is a May 1999 article in QST by Steve Ford (p41) that states that most of the PSK activity on 20m is between 14068 and 14080. One year later, Steve Ford published a second article (QST May 2000, p42) that says that 14070 was the "hot hangout." Of course, the 070 club was founded in mid-1999 and took its name from the frequency in use, so the common practice preceded the publications. (I picked up on the mode from that year 2000 article and a successor article the next month on Small Wonder Labs' PSK20, and got on the air in November 2000.)

I think the basic premise was that the various frequencies were within the generally-accepted band plans and weren't considered over-subscribed with other modes. In other words, 14070 (and 21070 and 18100 etc) were not already identified in other gentleman's agreements as being in use for other modes. Someone (could have been Peter Martinez, or Skip Teller, or Nick Fedoseev, or any of the other folks who were pioneering the mode or early software) had to suggest where on the dial to operate so the other few operators could find them. And that spread and became pervasive for over 15 years. Even the 070 club's archives document that, as we have had an "operating frequencies" page since about 2006 or so.

But I don't know is we'll ever be able to find out who was the first to suggest it or who the first "gentlemen" were. 

Steve
W3HF


-----Original Message-----
From: Steve R via Groups.Io <oldjavadrinker@...>
To: 070Club <070Club@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, May 8, 2018 10:16 pm
Subject: [070Club] Band Plan

I am doing a little studying for my prep on Ham radio Now, I was looking at the band plan issue, and discovered that the band plan doesnt specifically mention where each mode is to be used in the bands. For example, 20M has 14.070 14.095 says RTTY, however IARU describes it as narrow band digital.

Then it discusses a "gentlemen's agreement for suggested frequencies and had 14.070 as PSK. Exactly who and when was this gentlemens agreement made?

Any background would be helpful.

Thanks,

Steve VA3FLF
2301


 

Great explanation, Steve.  Thanks for the info!


Stephen Melachrinos
 

I was rushing to get this written this morning before work and I need to update and correct a few things that I wrote in haste.

Changes are in bold.

Steve
W3HF


-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Melachrinos <melachri@...>
To: 070Club <070Club@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 9, 2018 6:30 am
Subject: Re: [070Club] Band Plan

Steve -

Any agreement has to start with someone making a suggestion, and others "agreeing" with it. As more pile on, the agreement becomes more prevalent. And eventually (hopefully) it becomes pervasive.

(Note: a "gentleman's agreement" simply means there's no legal imperative, only that well-behaved gentlemen agree to follow it. "Legal imperative" includes both rules/laws and formal contracts, but a gentleman's agreement is typically never written down by the parties involved. The Wikipedia page on "Gentlemen's Agreement" states that one "...relies upon the honor of the parties for its fulfillment, rather than being in any way enforceable.")

PSK31 was developed by Peter Martinez; Peter released it to the amateur community in December 1998.The earliest published reference to operating frequencies I can find is a May 1999 article in QST by Steve Ford (p41) that states that most of the PSK activity on 20m was between 14068 and 14080. One year later, Steve Ford published a second article (QST May 2000, p42) that says that 14070 was the "hot hangout." Of course, the 070 club was founded in mid-2000 and took its name from the frequency in use, so the common practice observed by the 070 club founders was consistent with the publications of that time. (I picked up on the mode from that year 2000 article and a successor article the next month on Small Wonder Labs' PSK20, and got on the air in November 2000 with a PSK20.)

(What's interesting about the Small Wonder Labs series of transceivers is that they were rock-bound--they were crystal-controlled, with no tuning and no easy way to change crystals. That means that by the time they came out, PSK31 operations were "locked in" to certain frequencies. SWL had models for 10m, 20m, 30m, and 40m, and there was a derivative design for 80m sold by the NJQRP club. That further documents the operating frequencies in use, at least for those bands.)

I think the basic premise was that the various frequencies were within the generally-accepted digital band plans and weren't considered over-subscribed with other modes. In other words, 14070 (and 21070 and 18100 etc) were not already identified in other gentleman's agreements as being in use for other modes. Someone (could have been Peter Martinez, or Skip Teller, or Nick Fedoseev, or any of the other folks who were pioneering the mode or early software) had to suggest where on the dial to operate so the other few operators could find them. And that spread and became pervasive for over 15 years. Even the 070 club's archives document that, as we have had an "operating frequencies" page since about 2006 or so.

But I don't know if we'll ever be able to find out who was the first to suggest it or who the first "gentlemen" were. 

Steve
W3HF

_._,_._,_


Steve VA3FLF/KM4FLF
 

Thanks Steve. Very helpful. 

Steve
VA3FLF


On May 9, 2018, at 21:11, Stephen Melachrinos <melachri@...> wrote:

I was rushing to get this written this morning before work and I need to update and correct a few things that I wrote in haste.

Changes are in bold.

Steve
W3HF


-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Melachrinos <melachri@...>
To: 070Club <070Club@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 9, 2018 6:30 am
Subject: Re: [070Club] Band Plan

Steve -

Any agreement has to start with someone making a suggestion, and others "agreeing" with it. As more pile on, the agreement becomes more prevalent. And eventually (hopefully) it becomes pervasive.

(Note: a "gentleman's agreement" simply means there's no legal imperative, only that well-behaved gentlemen agree to follow it. "Legal imperative" includes both rules/laws and formal contracts, but a gentleman's agreement is typically never written down by the parties involved. The Wikipedia page on "Gentlemen's Agreement" states that one "...relies upon the honor of the parties for its fulfillment, rather than being in any way enforceable.")

PSK31 was developed by Peter Martinez; Peter released it to the amateur community in December 1998.The earliest published reference to operating frequencies I can find is a May 1999 article in QST by Steve Ford (p41) that states that most of the PSK activity on 20m was between 14068 and 14080. One year later, Steve Ford published a second article (QST May 2000, p42) that says that 14070 was the "hot hangout." Of course, the 070 club was founded in mid-2000 and took its name from the frequency in use, so the common practice observed by the 070 club founders was consistent with the publications of that time. (I picked up on the mode from that year 2000 article and a successor article the next month on Small Wonder Labs' PSK20, and got on the air in November 2000 with a PSK20.)

(What's interesting about the Small Wonder Labs series of transceivers is that they were rock-bound--they were crystal-controlled, with no tuning and no easy way to change crystals. That means that by the time they came out, PSK31 operations were "locked in" to certain frequencies. SWL had models for 10m, 20m, 30m, and 40m, and there was a derivative design for 80m sold by the NJQRP club. That further documents the operating frequencies in use, at least for those bands.)

I think the basic premise was that the various frequencies were within the generally-accepted digital band plans and weren't considered over-subscribed with other modes. In other words, 14070 (and 21070 and 18100 etc) were not already identified in other gentleman's agreements as being in use for other modes. Someone (could have been Peter Martinez, or Skip Teller, or Nick Fedoseev, or any of the other folks who were pioneering the mode or early software) had to suggest where on the dial to operate so the other few operators could find them. And that spread and became pervasive for over 15 years. Even the 070 club's archives document that, as we have had an "operating frequencies" page since about 2006 or so.

But I don't know if we'll ever be able to find out who was the first to suggest it or who the first "gentlemen" were. 

Steve
W3HF


Mike W4BZM
 

I think this weekend was an excellent demonstration that the IARU Regions need to do better coordination on band plans for digital operation in the HF bands.

I was very frustrated in trying to maintain a QSO with WB2MLY on 7.072 MHz, because we were getting QRM from voice stations in Europe working the CW SSB contest.  Out of curiosity, I looked up the IARU Region 1 band plan for 40 meters (see https://www.iaru-r1.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/hf_r1_bandplan.pdf)  .  It reads:

7.040 - 7.047  Preferred mode:  Narrow band modes , Usage:  Digimodes
7.047 - 7.050  Preferred mode:  Narrow band modes, Usage:  Digimodes, automatically controlled data stations (unattended)
7.060 - 7.100  Preferred mode:  All modes,  Usage :  SSB contest preferred  (7.070 "Digital voice Centre of Activity")
7.130 - 7.175  Preferred mode:  All modes,  Usage:  SSB contest preferred  (7.165 "Image Centre of Activity")
7.175 - 7.200  Preferred mode:  All modes,  Usage:  SSB contest preferred, Priority for intercontinental activity.

So while those of us in IARU Region 2 observe 7.000 to 7.125 as an RTTY/data band, and 7.072 as a PSK-31 domain, that is not the case for our European/African neighbors.  Fortunately, I haven't experienced a lot of SSB QRM on 7.072 except on international contest weekends, but it's a discrepancy I was not aware of until tonight.  I mention it because others may be as unaware as I was.

Mike W4BZM


Jerry N9AVY
 

Mike:

Sorry , but SOP during contests is that many rules go right out the window. I usually stand down during contests to keep nerves from being frayed.


73,

Jerry n9avy
,
Mike:

Sorry , but SOP during contests is that many rules go right out the window. I usually stand down during contests to keep nerves from being frayed.


73,

Jerry n9avy
Mike:

Sorry , but SOP during contests is that many rules go right out the window. I usually stand down during contests to keep nerves from being frayed.


73,

Jerry n9avy

On Sunday, October 25, 2020, 12:49:01 AM CDT, Mike W4BZM <behrcave@...> wrote:


I think this weekend was an excellent demonstration that the IARU Regions need to do better coordination on band plans for digital operation in the HF bands.

I was very frustrated in trying to maintain a QSO with WB2MLY on 7.072 MHz, because we were getting QRM from voice stations in Europe working the CW SSB contest.  Out of curiosity, I looked up the IARU Region 1 band plan for 40 meters (see https://www.iaru-r1.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/hf_r1_bandplan.pdf)  .  It reads:

7.040 - 7.047  Preferred mode:  Narrow band modes , Usage:  Digimodes
7.047 - 7.050  Preferred mode:  Narrow band modes, Usage:  Digimodes, automatically controlled data stations (unattended)
7.060 - 7.100  Preferred mode:  All modes,  Usage :  SSB contest preferred  (7.070 "Digital voice Centre of Activity")
7.130 - 7.175  Preferred mode:  All modes,  Usage:  SSB contest preferred  (7.165 "Image Centre of Activity")
7.175 - 7.200  Preferred mode:  All modes,  Usage:  SSB contest preferred, Priority for intercontinental activity.

So while those of us in IARU Region 2 observe 7.000 to 7.125 as an RTTY/data band, and 7.072 as a PSK-31 domain, that is not the case for our European/African neighbors.  Fortunately, I haven't experienced a lot of SSB QRM on 7.072 except on international contest weekends, but it's a discrepancy I was not aware of until tonight.  I mention it because others may be as unaware as I was.

Mike W4BZM


Mike W4BZM
 

Jerry, you missed the point of my post.  Nobody was violating any rules.  SSB on 7.070 is legal (in fact, encouraged during contests) in IARU Region 1 but not in IARU Region 2.  The problem is the disagreement in band plans between the IARU regions, on a frequency that supports world-wide comm.

...and yes, like you, I often stand down during the CQ WW contests. Maybe clean up the logbook or catch up on QSL cards.

Mike W4BZM


Bob Motyl KK6KMU
 

Mike, Region 3 has digital voice on 7.070 also.  I was doing some late night and early morning QSO's on 40 meters these last three weeks and got QRM from voice stations almost every night.  Frustrating to say the least.

Bob KK6KMU