An interesting article ...


Jerry N9AVY
 


Brian (N2MLP)
 

I think the problem is more based on laziness

 

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 

From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jerry N9AVY
Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 12:20 PM
To: 070Club
Subject: [070Club] An interesting article ...

 

 

Did Joe Taylor Destroy Amateur Radio? - NT0Z

 

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com


F.R. Ashley
 

What a silly article, not interesting at all.   Just one rambling diatribe against JT modes.   All of this FT/JT hysteria is getting rather ridiculous.   Would you rather the bands be dead quiet, or teeming with digital signals (and others)?   FT/JT isn't going away unless something else comes along which hams find more interesting and fun to use.    Get on the air, operate PSK or whatever mode you wish and quit worrying about the sky falling.

73,

Buddy WB4M




Kenneth W. Campbell <n6pcd@...>
 

I'm just SURE that back in the day, some spark gap guys JUST KNEW that the new-fangled CW mode would destroy the hobby...


Ray Clements
 

Buddy. Thank you for your comments.

If propagation conditions were good, there would be no interest in FT8. I love working PSK and to a lesser extent RTTY, but propagation is poor, especially for those with limited stations like mine. I live in an HOA and have to have my antennas hidden from view, so I have a 66 ft OCF wire antenna strung at a height of 21 ft off the ground, far from ideal.

At 1300 UTC, I turned on my radio and started looking for signals. On 40m, all I could hear was noise. On 20 m, the noise level was lower, but I could not hear any signals. On 17m , 15m, 12m, and 10m, there was little noise, but neither could I detect any signals. So I had two choices: turn off the radio and pursue other interests, or fire up WSJT-X and check out FT8. From the fall of 2015, unit the spring of 2018 when I decided to check out FT8, my choice was to turn off the radio. I made only 11 HF contacts during that 2 1/2 year period. I suspect I was not alone in my inactivity.

Over the past six weeks, I have confirmed 20 DXCC entities using FT8 whereas I have only been able to confirm 3 using PSK modes. Non of those entities were new for me, but at least FT8 gives me hope of confirming the last 6 entities I need for DXCC.  I became a ham in 2013 and made most of my DXCC contacts in 2014 and early 2015 when propagation was reasonable.

The last half of the 20th century experienced some of the highest solar activity on record. Many of the hams who express a profound distaste for FT8 have been on the air for decades and experienced great radio propagation resulting from that solar activity.   However, with the beginning of the 21st century, solar activity began to decline and some have even wondered if we may experience another solar minimum such as the Maunder Minimum that occurred in the 17th century, plunging Europe into a mini-Ice Age.

We are now in the solar minimum between solar cycles 24 and 25. Cycle 25 is expected to be similar to cycle 24, so the best we can expect is conditions similar to 2014; that won't happen until 2025.  Until then, propagation on the upper bands will be poor. For those hams who live in rural areas and can afford to erect tall towers and large antennas, fed by legal-limit amplifiers, the 80m and 160m bands will be the bands of choice. For the large numbers of hams who live in urban and suburban areas who are unable to erect tall towers and large antennas, their choices will be to turn off the radio until solar activity improves, or resort to modes such a FT8 that can decode signals that may be too weak to hear. Thus, I see Joe Taylor as the savior of amateur radio over the next 5 years rather than the author of its demise.

As we get close to the peak of solar cycle 25, hopefully, there will be limited need for FT8. In fact, FT8 may become useless as stations will be able to detect so many signals that there will be a massive pileup on the FT8 frequencies. In that situation, people will go back to less sensitive digital modes such as PSK. We need options that will work when propagation is good and we need options that will work when propagation is poor. Joe Taylor and friends are trying to provide those later options.

Ray N9RWC







------ Original Message ------
Received: 05:23 PM CDT, 05/06/2018
From: "F.R. Ashley" <gdadx2@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] An interesting article ...


What a silly article, not interesting at all.   Just one rambling diatribe against JT modes.   All of this FT/JT hysteria is getting rather ridiculous.   Would you rather the bands be dead quiet, or teeming with digital signals (and others)?   FT/JT isn't going away unless something else comes along which hams find more interesting and fun to use.    Get on the air, operate PSK or whatever mode you wish and quit worrying about the sky falling.

73,

Buddy WB4M



On 5/6/2018 12:20 PM, Jerry N9AVY wrote:





Rick - N7WE
 

Ray-
Don't give up on PSK31.  Even with prop as poor as it is, there is still activity on 20m during the daylight hours and 40m after the sun sets.  When you don't see a signal on the band, try calling CQ  every 30 seconds.  Bet you won't go 10 minutes without a contact.  Yup, I'm in an HOA too, and restrictions make it harder than having a tower and beam.  But even measly antennas work.  I worked Carlos - TI8II on 20m at 15:31 UTC today with 30w from my driveway with a 20m Hamstick on a magmount on the roof of my Honda CRV.  It doesn't get much poorer for a poor antenna!  599 both ways.  So keep trying.  The harder it is, the more satisfying the QSO is...at least for me.  The Three Day Weekend Contest is coming up June 1-3 and I guarantee that no matter how bad prop is, there will be a bunch of PSKers on the bands.  Hope to work you then.
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


Jerry N9AVY
 

A beam at 40 ft is always a game changer.  Sometimes with poor conditions my beam will be aimed East and I won't hear stations from West or South... if Asia is on, I probably won't hear them.  :-(   When noise level here is S-9 or more, many stations will be lost in noise.
 
jerry
 



From: Rick - N7WE <n7we1980@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 7, 2018 12:30 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] An interesting article ...

Ray-
Don't give up on PSK31.  Even with prop as poor as it is, there is still activity on 20m during the daylight hours and 40m after the sun sets.  When you don't see a signal on the band, try calling CQ  every 30 seconds.  Bet you won't go 10 minutes without a contact.  Yup, I'm in an HOA too, and restrictions make it harder than having a tower and beam.  But even measly antennas work.  I worked Carlos - TI8II on 20m at 15:31 UTC today with 30w from my driveway with a 20m Hamstick on a magmount on the roof of my Honda CRV.  It doesn't get much poorer for a poor antenna!  599 both ways.  So keep trying.  The harder it is, the more satisfying the QSO is...at least for me.  The Three Day Weekend Contest is coming up June 1-3 and I guarantee that no matter how bad prop is, there will be a bunch of PSKers on the bands.  Hope to work you then.
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602



Virus-free. www.avg.com


Paul Milward <nu4c@...>
 

Has FT8 affected PSK 31 operations? Yes it has, but poor propagation due to the solar cycle is the biggest culprit in current PSK OPs. 
I completed 366, but it took until autumn 2017. So I decided to try again. I usually operate less than an hour per day. My minimalist station has only a 43ft vertical so 90% of my contacts are USA east of the Mississippi. But I am still on track for at least one PSK QSO per day in 2018.
Get on the air with PSK31, contacts can be made, even from simple stations.
GL 73
we
Paul NU4C

Sent from my Galaxy Tab® A