Date   

Re: psk31 software for linux??

Steve W3HF
 

Ernest -

I'm not doing it, but I have worked WA0EIR and CX7BF, both of whom said they
were running Linux PSK software.

Steve
W3HF

-----Original Message-----
From: Ernest [mailto:ds3@tds.net]
Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 3:27 PM
To: 070@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [070] psk31 software for linux??


I'm looking to make contact with anyone on the list that is operating
PSK31 on PCs running linux.

Thanks,
Ernest, KG9NI

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psk31 software for linux??

Ernest <ds3@...>
 

I'm looking to make contact with anyone on the list that is operating
PSK31 on PCs running linux.

Thanks,
Ernest, KG9NI


Re: Attn FD ops

Richard B Drake
 

Thanks for forwarding that Jay.

In the aftermath of September 11 with our new focus on Homeland
Security and protection against total communications breakdowns,
it seems to me that Amateur radio has a new opportunity to shine
brightly. The phone system cam be attacked and disabled, the
internet can be attacked and disabled. But how could a million
individual amateur radio operators sprinkled all over the Americas
who are ready willing and able to provide communications in any
emergency be attacked and disabled? There is no way that could be
done. This Field Day may be one of the most significant ones in
history.

I'm planning to operate from home with my FT-817 on battery power
using portable antennas. Hope to see you all on PSK31.

----
73, Rich - W3ZJ

-----Original Message-----
From: N3DQU@aol.com [mailto:N3DQU@aol.com]
Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 10:58 AM
To: 070@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [070] Attn FD ops


This from the ARRL:
"...Field Day! This weekend is ARRL Field Day, possibly
ham radio's most
popular organized operating activity. In the past this


Re: Attn FD ops

AA8QQJMauch@...
 

How soon we forget. Remember that old Russian woodpecker from 40m?
Or what about Saddams jammers/counter jammers. But then again, I guess
that's what FD is all about. Communicating though any type of adversity or
adversary.

CU on FD,
73
Jay - AA8QQ


Attn FD ops

N3DQU@...
 

This from the ARRL:
"...Field Day! This weekend is ARRL Field Day, possibly ham radio's most
popular organized operating activity. In the past this bulletin only
commented on domestic propagation for Field Day weekend, but this
year for the first time Field Day is expanded to cover all of the
Americas. The new rules say that anyone in IARU Region II may
participate, and this covers all of North, Central and South
America, Greenland, the Caribbean, as well as some Pacific Islands.
IARU Region II is the same as ITU Region II, and you can see a map
of Region II at, http://www.echelon.ca/iarumsr2/ituregions.html .

Remember that in Field Day there is no multiplier or extra credit
for number of states, sections, zones or countries worked. Contacts
with stations in all areas count the same. This distinguishes Field
Day from contests where top scorers pay close attention to working
the maximum number of multipliers. In Field Day multipliers and
extra credit are earned for operating low power, from batteries, and
for generating publicity for amateur radio's emergency preparedness
capabilities. See
http://www.arrl.org/contests/rules/2002/rules-fd-2002.html for
complete rules...."

Also, if you are looking for bonus points, you can get 100 for copying the
special W1AW FD bulletin. According to QST, they will be transmitting the
bulletin in PSK31 on Sunday at 12:00PM eastern time. You have to send the
text in along with your entry, so remember to either open up a logfile before
they begin transmission or do a copy/paste before you shut down your PSK31
software to save the text...cu on the air de Jay N3DQU.


Re: Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124

Dieter, DL2RR <dl2rr@...>
 

I agree, and I had already several connections within Europe using some 100mW, that was  sufficient for a  perfect readable reception of the message. But surely as you already observed, it works only on an clear band (or channel) like on 17m. On 10m & 15m (if open) and always on 20m it does not take 2 minutes, until at least one station calls CQ on the QRG, and any contact is broken. That is the reality, with which we have to live !
If one is no patient ham, the next step is a grasp to the power regulator, or you can forget this contact, hi.
 
73' de Dieter - DL2RR (mostly QRP)

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 1:57 AM
Subject: RE: [070] Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124

Let me add my general support for what's been said here, with a qualifier. Antennas are VERY important, but even more so is propagation. QRP DXing is satisfying, but it's even more so when I find that we are completing a QSO that is "QRP, attic dipole to attic dipole," as Sean G4UCJ and I did a few months ago.
 
Although there are differences in antenna systems, I think a big difference is that there are very few, if any, stations running anywhere close to the legal limit in power output. When I operate 5W SSB, I'm 23 dB (~4 S-units) below the kilowatt station with the same antenna. But when the "big guns" in PSK are only running 40-50 watts, my disadvantage is only 10 dB, less than 2 S-units. So it's easier (but still not simple) to be heard and break through a pileup.
 
But it is true that "anybody can do anything with PSK." Many of us "antenna-constrained QRPers" are proof of that. The main limitation in working exotic DX seems to be how few stations there are QRV in the remote locations.
 
72/73,
Steve
W3HF


Re: Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124

Steve W3HF
 

Let me add my general support for what's been said here, with a qualifier. Antennas are VERY important, but even more so is propagation. QRP DXing is satisfying, but it's even more so when I find that we are completing a QSO that is "QRP, attic dipole to attic dipole," as Sean G4UCJ and I did a few months ago.
 
Although there are differences in antenna systems, I think a big difference is that there are very few, if any, stations running anywhere close to the legal limit in power output. When I operate 5W SSB, I'm 23 dB (~4 S-units) below the kilowatt station with the same antenna. But when the "big guns" in PSK are only running 40-50 watts, my disadvantage is only 10 dB, less than 2 S-units. So it's easier (but still not simple) to be heard and break through a pileup.
 
But it is true that "anybody can do anything with PSK." Many of us "antenna-constrained QRPers" are proof of that. The main limitation in working exotic DX seems to be how few stations there are QRV in the remote locations.
 
72/73,
Steve
W3HF

-----Original Message-----
From: ebruchac@... [mailto:ebruchac@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 20, 2002 7:29 PM
To: 070@...
Subject: Re: [070] Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124----re: the re;

     I agree,pretty much with Jim's reasoning,and with Bernie's observation about the antennas.When I make a European contact,on 5 watts,it is very satisfying,but it's a product of the other station having a good antenna system.
Yeah, I'm a little redneck baby in the woods, when it comes to contesting,and,other than Field day,my only contests have been those sponsored here....

     I don't think we need to rationalize why we work psk.Like other modes,it has its' attractions.For me,it's a more laid back approach to making qsos,and because I enjoy qrp,it's ideal for my setup.Also,I have had my most satisfying qsos on PSK.I think it's the mindset,that we develop,while  reading the other station--we tend to become more attentive to what is being said...

     I'm in agreement that the automation tends to over -ride the awareness of what is actually happening,during a psk qso.
     Don't know about the IROC analogy though....I can actually watch PSK for more than 5 minutes without falling asleep......
     Thanks for an interesting thread,and will look for y'all this wekend.
Ed N4ZUM
   Check out the 070 Club website at
< http://hometown.aol.com/n3dqu/podxs070.htm > for
the latest information on 070 Club activities.
  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
070-unsubscribe@... or N3DQU@....



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Re: Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124

N3DQU@...
 

In a message dated 6/20/2002 7:59:11 PM Eastern Daylight Time, w3hf@... writes:


The main limitation in working exotic DX seems to be how few stations there are QRV in the remote locations.


   Mebbe the APE Award will take care of that little problem....Jay N3DQU.


Re: Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124----re: the re;

ebruchac@...
 

     I agree,pretty much with Jim's reasoning,and with Bernie's observation about the antennas.When I make a European contact,on 5 watts,it is very satisfying,but it's a product of the other station having a good antenna system.
Yeah, I'm a little redneck baby in the woods, when it comes to contesting,and,other than Field day,my only contests have been those sponsored here....

     I don't think we need to rationalize why we work psk.Like other modes,it has its' attractions.For me,it's a more laid back approach to making qsos,and because I enjoy qrp,it's ideal for my setup.Also,I have had my most satisfying qsos on PSK.I think it's the mindset,that we develop,while  reading the other station--we tend to become more attentive to what is being said...

     I'm in agreement that the automation tends to over -ride the awareness of what is actually happening,during a psk qso.
     Don't know about the IROC analogy though....I can actually watch PSK for more than 5 minutes without falling asleep......
     Thanks for an interesting thread,and will look for y'all this wekend.
Ed N4ZUM


Zakanaka and neutered Tom Cats?

Ed Bruchac <ebruchac@...>
 

Well Duncan,now that you mention it, our Tom Cat has had ,"Delusions of
Gender",ever since returning from his visit to the vet.....
Ed N4ZUM


4K6DI

Dave Kjellquist, WB5NHL
 

Last night approximately 02:00z 4K6DI was calling CQ
on 20M. Couldn't get him even with a strong signal
into PA.

73, WB5NHL


Re: Zakanaka?

AA8QQJMauch@...
 

Sounds like a virus someone wanted to spread around.
Guess it wasn't as catchy as they thought.
73,
Jay - AA8QQ


Ten Tec - New QRP rig coming in August.

N3DQU@...
 

Saw a small note in this month's QST that Ten Tec is coming out with a new
QRP rig in August: 160-10m, 20w max out, all mode, built-in cw keyer, all
band rcv, if dsp, 100 memories, they even give you a mike this time, price
$795 (same price as an SG-2020 with dsp, but abt 100 bux more than an
FT-817)... Looks interesting, but for some reason they opted to use led's for
the freq readout, so rcv current draw kind of heavy for battery ops..for more
info check out their website at < http://tentec.com/TT516.htm > ....Jay
N3DQU.


PSK programs etc

Duncan <zl3jt@...>
 

de Jungle Telegraph
Seriously now, there are those who will tell the world that their program/radio/antenna/computer/etc
is the best! Just because they have it. Many comments are made in the usual stuff
sent over the radio, and usually the guy saying it means well. Stick with the program
you are familiar with, and become proficient using it, especially working split!

Consider the recipient of your message....Are they really interested in the program/radio/computer/temp
in your shack? Probably not! Interest may be centred on your power, and perhaps your
antenna, for them to make rationale of the propagation conditions.
They already know that you have a computer with a soundcard inside it....so what's
the point in wasting time telling them?
I don't really care how fast, or how much RAM is in it.
Most do not read what the other guy is saying anyway, because they are too wrapped
up in their own ego...
The proof is on the screen in front of you when there is a rare DX station on the
band printing: XX0XX QRZ up...
and people continue to call on his trace!
And then when someone calls a specific station or area of the world when they know
they have propagation to that area, people will call without reading what the guy
is printing.... It is a little disturbing at times. The solution is to find out what
is happening on the frequency by looking at what's happening, before you PTT...or
TX the
program...
Sticking the time in UTC at the end of a QSO just wastes time, especially for the
rest of the DXers who would like to make a contact to the DX!
Save that for those who don't have a clock in their computer!
DXCC contacts require Date, Mode, Band, and Callsigns only, the rest is irrelevant
and can be found out be other means.
The time in UTC may assist in a log search, but it is not a requirement...
73s Duncan


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Zakanaka?

Duncan <zl3jt@...>
 

de Jungle Telegraph
Ed N4ZUM requests:
Any comments on Zakanaka appreciated.

Is it the reason your tom cat was taken to the vet?
73s




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Re: Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124

DL2AYL@...
 

Hi Bernie, Jay and the others,
 
Yes Bernie you are right, living in a high rise with loads of neighbors I never had an amplifier but was just lucky to get the permission to put up my logperiodic on the roof. I have a simple FT900, now six years old, and a lot of persistence, can't stop going in a contest (when the condx are good) .
And Jim got it right when he compared PSK with soccer,
kids are playing it everywhere here, they don't need expensive gear, sometimes a tin can must do for a ball.
See you in the next Rumble!
73's Erika/DL2AYL
 
 
 


Re: Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124

Bernie <kf4fhs@...>
 

Hey Jay and All,
 
  I think Jim's thoughts are pretty accurate.
 
  In my opinion, and we all know what opinions are like, the mega-buck, mega-watt stations don't have much of an advantage over the plain ole, run of the mill rig, in a PSK contest, except for one thing, all these fellers who spend more money on their amplifiers, than I make in a year, have extraordinarily good antennas. I think the antenna along with LOTS of persistence are the keys to getting a good score in a PSK contest. Besides, it sure is more satisfing to work someone halfway around the world on 25 watts, rather than a killerwatt.
 
       73, Bernie / KF4FHS
 
 
 

   So what do  you guys think abt Jim's analogy? Do you think that PSK levels the playing field for all as he suggests? Can we say that PSK is the IROC of ham radio, or are we still just babes in the woods who have yet to learn the ins and outs of contesting? Ur comments greatly appreciated...Jay N3DQU.  


Re: Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124

N3DQU@...
 

In a message dated 6/20/2002 12:26:40 AM Eastern Daylight Time, N3DQU@... writes:


But, the only level playing field around is PSK and its puny bandwidth,
piddling power output and dinky antennas. As a result PSK has a bit of the
appeal
of soccer. Anybody can do anything in PSK. Nobody, even those who
occasionally destroy the band with a giant signal, have much of an edge over
the
person running a measly 25 watts to a dipole in the attic.


   So what do  you guys think abt Jim's analogy? Do you think that PSK levels the playing field for all as he suggests? Can we say that PSK is the IROC of ham radio, or are we still just babes in the woods who have yet to learn the ins and outs of contesting? Ur comments greatly appreciated...Jay N3DQU.


Jim's GAZETTE Newsletter #124

N3DQU@...
 

Jim's GAZETTE
Newsletter #124
20 June 2002

Please feel free to forward this newsletter to any and all interested
parties, or to reproduce it in
any publication. All we ask is that you give credit where it is due.

SHORT NOTES: NOTES: Email for 4X6UO should be addressed to
gldc1090@netvision.net.il, Thanks to the many responses to my plea!

If you grew up anywhere near New York City and had an interest in radio,
there was but one place to go. A magnet for hams and hams-to-be and anybody
else with an interest in radio, this special place was called Radio Row, a
perfect definition of a Manhattan neighborhood devoted to the subject. You
can
see it all again by dialing to www.sonicmemorial.org/radiorow/radiorow.html.
Take a peek and enjoy for there is nothing left of the real thing!

An interesting note from Dick KD6AZN/7J1BBC followed up on the attitude and
practice of the PSK31 operator during traditional contests and DX pileups.
They are a different breed. After commenting on the ARRL poll, blaming PSK's
victory on the faddishness of new modes, Dick went on to make the
following observations: 'Lots of guys with computers and digital soundcard
modes (PSK, MFSK, etc) really don't understand where they are transmitting
on the spectrum. In the recent Wake Island DXpedition, the op called .5 to 1
UP. With my 4 Khz spectral display I could see half the callers were split
but
must have been LSB. They call went .5 to 1 DOWN, into the Pacific Ocean. No
chance of a return from Wake.

My favorite, though, is the software that allows the operator to send out a
macro saying-logged in at TT:TT:TT Z. The computer calculates and precisely
enters the time . . to the nearest 1/100th of a second. Remarkable! But many
times the operator failed to set the computer and the time/day report was
hours or even days off. Makes for interesting logs!'

Thanks Dick. Yes, I've seen it all. Hi! In reality, though, I don't think
many of the PSK operators think in terms of exact frequencies. Rather they
see
Bands. If they want to work 20M, they set the USB dial at 14.0695 and work at
the visible signals. Clicking above or below that QRG doesn't register as a
frequency shift. It's merely a mouse click that puts the cursor on the next
or best trace on the waterfall. It's an easy habit to form. After all, what
difference
does it make whether it is to the left or the right of the 14.0695 mark. My
Pegasus dial on the laptop screen doesn't change from that setting whether I
move up or down as I tune. The exactness issue is quickly forgotten in that
environment and, though the habit may change over the years who needs to
know whether the contact was made on 14.068.2 or 14.070.4?

All of which leads to much of the confusion seen when the DX op goes to a
split operation. It's not too difficult even for those of us who have been
away
from such stuff for a long while. But for the typical new PSK user it is
probably so much doublespeak. Maybe some kind sole will write up a nice,
fundamental tutorial on the subject. I'll surely be happy to distribute the
message!

Joe EI4FV is, yes, Irish. And it was with some obvious pleasure that he
forwarded the story about Lee DeForest and his Irish experiments during the
year
1903. It involved stations in Ireland and Wales and operators who were
sending code back and forth at 30-35 WPM, even though amply fortified with
product from the local pub! The excellent tale of life in the tower (and the
incredible event that followed) can be found at
www.n2hos.com/digital/ei4fv.html.
Do read it.

In any event, the Bayside Scouts are going to commemorate this important test
operation by operating EI4LDF during June 29-30. All bands included and
modes are CW and PSK31. Work them!

But that's not the end of the EI4FV story. During an Email exchange, he
suggested that I might want to root for the Irish soccer team who were to
play the
Spaniards that very night. I wished his team well, though I had absolutely no
intention of staying up all night long to witness the event! HI. In fact I
know
so little about soccer having watched but a few minutes on TV over the years
that it just isn't on my schedule. Oh, I admit to a bit of enthusiasm when
the
US Ladies team won big a while back and now there is a bit of a tingle now
that the US Men's team could do something. But that's a bit of pride in the
old
flag, not a love or understanding of this strange game.

I do admit that the morning after receiving Joe's Email, the first thing I
looked for in the newspaper was the soccer score. Ireland lost on penalty
shots.
The game ended in a tie. The two teams then participated in some kind of a
shootout to determine a winner. Perhaps because of such a strange rule, I
decided to watch a bit of the game in this most popular sport of all to see
if I could make any sense of it..

Gradually, I began to understand the reason for the game's universal
attraction. Wherever it is played, in every country in the world, the game is
the
same. The playing field is level, completely so. There are no fields that
favor one team over the other for if it's muddy, it's muddy at both ends of
the grid.
No team fields more players than its opponent. Yes, players are recruited,
bought and sold to improve the team, though money alone cannot produce a
winning team. For, in the end, the game is decided by a combination of skill,
dedication, durability, intelligence, coaching and coordination performed by
players assembled from one geographic area. In the end, every team has the
opportunity to work a miracle and it happens with some frequency. That's
an unbeatable combination for the fans. And their numbers prove the case. I
can't count the billions and billions who watch the World Cup on TV,
numbers that dwarf the appeal of the more familiar sports here in the US.

So, you ask, what the heck has this got to do with ham radio? Not much,
except for those activities some describe as radio sports-Contesting, for
example. In general, success in any mode is dominated by those with big
antenna farms, multiple rigs, and seriously amplified signals. I don't mean
to
suggest that it is wrong to build the super station or run the biggest
amplifier or operate the largest number of rigs possible. It is legal and an
acceptable
method. If winning is that important, and if that is what it takes to win,
it's your privilege, if you can afford it.

But, the only level playing field around is PSK and its puny bandwidth,
piddling power output and dinky antennas. As a result PSK has a bit of the
appeal
of soccer. Anybody can do anything in PSK. Nobody, even those who
occasionally destroy the band with a giant signal, have much of an edge over
the
person running a measly 25 watts to a dipole in the attic.

And that, to get back to the beginning of this epistle, is why I don't think
the ARRL poll is a fluke. The 'fan' appeal of the PSK mode attracts thousands
of
participants who occupy the various bands 24/7 simply because they love to
play the game. It's no surprise to me that PSK is the favorite by a big and
by
a growing margin.

73 de Jim N2HOS: GAZETTE at www.n2hos.com/digital


FD Plans...Zakanaka?

ebruchac@...
 

Everyone getting ready,at least on this side of the pond, for Field Day?
I'm using Digipan,but since I've worked so many stations who are using
Zakanaka,I'm curious what the appeal of it is?
Any comments on Zakanaka appreciated.
73,
Ed N4ZUM,sweltering in the 92 degree June doldrums.....