Date   

Re: Any PSK31 on 160m?

Mike Besemer <mwbesemer@...>
 

Rick,

I have not been on lately but would love to give it a try. Let me know what works for you.

Mike
WM4B

On Jan 24, 2018 8:47 AM, Rick - N7WE <n7we1980@...> wrote:
Anyone have info about 160m propagation lately? Has there been PSK31 activity on the band? I can only get on when I rig a temporary antenna (HOA restrictions) so I'm in the dark as to current status. I still need 4 more 160m stations to fill the Top Band endorsement. If things go according to plan I will be setting up the 160m end fed inverted L for the Valentine Sprint. In the meantime, if 160m is hopping, I'll get it up and get on. Even though it means taking it down each morning - hi hi!
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


Any PSK31 on 160m?

Rick - N7WE
 

Anyone have info about 160m propagation lately?  Has there been PSK31 activity on the band?  I can only get on when I rig a temporary antenna (HOA restrictions) so I'm in the dark as to current status.  I still need 4 more 160m stations to fill the Top Band endorsement.  If things go according to plan I will be setting up the 160m end fed inverted L for the Valentine Sprint.  In the meantime, if 160m is hopping, I'll get it up and get on.  Even though it means taking it down each morning - hi hi!
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


New DXCC !

Jerry N9AVY
 

Republic of Kosovo (Z6) has been added to the DXCC List of current entities, increasing the total number of current DXCC entities to 340. The addition of Kosovo raises to 331 the required number of current entities confirmed to qualify for DXCC Honor Roll; Top of Honor Roll is 340. DXCC award accounts are being tabulated to reflect the change.
This change qualifies as an “event,” effective on January 21, 2018, at 0000 UTC. Nothing is retroactive.


Re: Lightning Protection

Rick - N7WE
 

Brian-
Very interesting.  I suspect what got you was a positive lightning stike.  Yes, lightning strikes can be either positive or negative.  About 95% are negative, but positive strikes can have 10 times more power and therefore much larger EMP.  That's when ground differentials can really bite.
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


Re: Lightning Protection

Joseph Molon <ljl2002@...>
 

Rick,
I'm not in the lightning capital of the world but after spending my career in TV broadcast several times I got a front row seat to witness what Mother Nature can do when she gets upset.  I have a great respect for the power of a lightning strike.  When there is a 500 foot lightning rod outside the building it's only a matter of time.
At home there was a 4 foot rod for the electrical ground.  I added two 8 foot rods and bonded everything together.  There is lightning protection on all lead ins.  It must be OK because we had a strike last year in a neighbors yard about 150 feet from my setup.  All OK.  Everyone should protect to the max because you never know.  This strike came out of a small localized thunderstorm and took everyone by surprise.  TV's and security cameras in the area got smoked from it.
One strike at the TV transmitter site actually hit a 20 foot tree about 150 feet from the tower.  Lightning will go wherever it makes a connection to ground regardless of what "better" objects are in the area.
Healthy respect.  Yep.
 
Joe
KA1PPV  #1482
 
 
 

On Sun, Jan 21, 2018 at 07:08 PM, Rick - N7WE wrote:
 
 
Thanks for posting this Jerry.  As one who lives in "the lightning capital of the US,"  let me add a double ROGER THAT! to everything he said. 
I have 3 coax leads that come into the house and every one of them has its own lightning arrestor installed on a 8 ft ground rod which is bonded with all the equipment inside the shack.  There is a short run of about 6 ft for each coax to a pass thru drilled through the aluminum window frame.  It also provides the pass through for the station grounding and grounds the window frame.  Each coax has its own barrel connector and when the thunder rolls, I disconnect all coax inside coax at the entry panel. This setup also including the coax from the emergency 2m J-pole in the attic that runs outside through the soffit, thru an arrestor, and then back inside to the shack.  I don't remember how much I actually spent when I put in the shack, but it certainly wasn't as much as Dale did.  But then my setup is probably much simpler.  I'm pretty sure that all in it was less than $500.  That's peanuts compared to the cost of a new tranciever, and not even close to the cost of the hotel while they rebuild your house after the fire!
The only thing I would add to what Dale said is that if you have a vertical consider a tilt base - they make it really easy to reduce your exposure. Here in Florida I consider it mandatory and tip that hunk of aluminum horizontal when the storms move in.  Some times during the season it tilts up and down several times a day!  Even if you don't live in a high thunderstorm area, lightning protection is something you should have.  You may not need it, but if you ever need it, you will really need it!

--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


Re: Lightning Protection

B C <k9wis@...>
 

Interesting about the ground differentials..several years ago I saw a storm approaching and had time to completely disconnect my radio from the antenna system and I unplugged the power supply..As I was walking out of the shack there was a flash and kapow behind me..Lightning hit the road in front of my house, and destroyed the radio, my garage door opener and all my phones..The only connection I had to my radio was the ground wire.

Brian K9WIS
---- Jerry N9AVY <n9avy@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

This showed up a few minutes ago on local club reflector and I believe it's a worthwhile read.  Dale is an old friend who move from IL (my area) out to Iowa many years ago. Before he went to work for Collins, he worked at designing RF shielded booths for testing radio equipment - lot of copper screen !

If you have outdoor antennas, I think you should read this (especially those in Florida "the lightning capital of US).

Jerry  n9avy

Everyone on this thread:

I  can not help but throw in some comments on this most important and necessary aspect of ham radio operating.  I'll try to be brief, but please bear in mind that there are a lot of aspects to this seemingly simple task that deserve some serious consideration, particularly as regards lightning safety.

First, I strongly suggest that all persons in need of installing and running transmission lines go out and buy, beg, or borrow a copy of Grounding and Bonding for the Radio Amateur, by Ward Silver, N0AX.  This ARRL book was released early last year and discusses many safety aspects of antenna and radio station grounding, including lightning protection.  Full disclosure: I was one of the reviewers and contributors for the book.

Now, to the topic at hand.  Way back in 1976, which was when I moved into my Crystal Lake house, I committed many of the very installation errors (out of ignorance) that I now fight hard to get hams NOT to do when putting in their installation.  I was a rooftop antenna farmer at that time (located in Coventry West, not far from Crystal Lake South HS) and I brought all of my radio coax and TV antenna cables inside via roof-mounted feed-thrus, then fed the cables down to the attic and inside the walls to various destinations within.  It was the perfect set-up for creating what I have since termed the "Kingsford Effect", so-named for the possible conversion of a wooden structure into a material used for outdoor cooking.  I grounded the antenna masts and roof tripod supports (2 of them) via #8 wire run on the roof and dropped down to a ground rod at the back of the house.

There are all kinds of ways to actually bring the cables into the house.  The actual approach taken by any given ham is largely the result of preference, cost, and ease of installation.  My  issue is that NONE of these approaches are safe unless lightning protection is included as part of the installation package and all protectors are properly grounded.  I will also keep this discussion limited to those installations having no more than 3 or 4 coax cables and maybe 1 rotator or remote RF switch control cable. 

For those using the "drill hole, install pipe, pull cables, and pack to preclude insects" approach, all you need to do is sink an 8 foot ground rod just outside the wall hole and place one of the readily available multi-protector mounts onto the top of the rod.  That effectively grounds and protects those cables outside of the house.  You may have to get inventive if you also need to mount an 8-line control protector for a rotator or remote RF switch.  (What, you were not planning to protect the switch?   Trust me when I say that if lightning gets onto the RF cables, it will almost surely couple onto the unshielded control cables, too.  The rotator or switch might get zapped, but you do not want lightning energy coming along that cable and into the shack.)

Next, and this is VERY important:  you MUST bond that ground rod to the equipment in your station AND you must also bond it to the electrical ground of your AC service panel.  (Yes, allowable as an Auxiliary Ground per the NEC.)  The reason: failure to bond all of the shack equipment together and failure to bond the station ground to the AC power electrical service panel ground allows a very severe voltage differential to develop during a lightning strike.  It is that differential that causes so much damage to equipment in the shack and in the house. Also, the power panel should be equipped with a while-house surge protector.   

Next, please note John's comments below about having a grounding type of switch in the shack for his coax cables.  I discovered that many DXers use a similar scheme here in Iowa when I addressed the Eastern Iowa DX Association on the topic of lightning protection in October, 2016.  Consider this:  by using such a switch as the sole means of grounding and protecting the coax cables, you are allowing the lightning energy to travel all the way into your shack and right onto your operating desk or table.  Is that what you REALLY want?  These types of switches are fine as follow-on protectors when external protector for each coax line are installed outside the shack or house.  Their most useful function is to reduce induced currents in the cables that may occur in the run from the outside protector to the shack equipment.  After all, that cable "looks" like a conductor to close-by energy currents.

Finally, I told the EIDXA that I can not endorse the MFJ (and any similar feed-thru entrance panels) that are sold for use with windows or in eaves.  Why?  Take a careful look at what they offer.  Assuming that the owner does actually attach a proper (AWG 4 or 6) ground wire to the panel, the coax cables that attach to the panel via the provided feed-thru coax connectors will have their outer shields grounded, but no protection to the center conductors.  Fortunately, that problem is rather easily fixed if a coax protector is installed on each line just to the outside of the window or eave panel.  So, for those who chose to use on of these panels, do not forget to install the protectors on it.

Now, for the kicker on these panels: have you noticed the adjustable feed-thru clamp that lows you to pass a rotator cable connector thru the panel?  OK, you pass the connector thru and close the clamp around the cable.  So?  You have the same problem as was discussed for the wall holes.  Bottom line: there needs to be a multi-line protector just outside the panel for that control cable.

Yes, I know that putting in the protectors and proper grounding takes time and costs money that you would prefer to put into rigs.  I get that.  I did my design and installation out here way back in 2000.  At today's prices for the roughly 18 cables I installed, the protectors, ground rods and #2 wire, and the weatherproof entrance boxes I used would cost around $2500 to $3000.  Was it worth it?  Look at it this way: when I moved out here in 2000, I had been hamming for 38 years.  I had ZERO lightning hits on my antennas in those years.  Then, I got hit 2 years in succession: 2008 and 2009.  The 2008 had the extra thrill factor of me holding the mic in my hand of the radio whose antenna got hit and talking (passing emergency traffic)..  Net result: ZERO damage to me or any equipment in my shack or house..  Yeah, it was worth every penny.  Antennas and coax cables on the tower got blasted to bits and one coax protector was blown up internally..  Everything on the tower should be considered as expendable.

So, lots of great ideas so far on how to get thru the wall.  I hope everyone will add in the safety aspects of lightning protection and proper grounding to their installation ideas.

73, Dale
WA9ENA
Former MCWA member, now in Monticello, IA 
Retired EMC engineer from Rockwell Collins


Re: Lightning Protection

Jerry N9AVY
 

Rick:

Had one of the 10-10 group who had a vertical atop 100 ft tower in FL.  Know he took a hit a few years back.

The only place worse for lightning is somewhere in Africa... not many hams there.

Glad you enjoyed the email.

Jerry



From: Rick - N7WE <n7we1980@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 21, 2018 6:08 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] Lightning Protection

Thanks for posting this Jerry.  As one who lives in "the lightning capital of the US,"  let me add a double ROGER THAT! to everything he said. 
I have 3 coax leads that come into the house and every one of them has its own lightning arrestor installed on a 8 ft ground rod which is bonded with all the equipment inside the shack.  There is a short run of about 6 ft for each coax to a pass thru drilled through the aluminum window frame.  It also provides the pass through for the station grounding and grounds the window frame.  Each coax has its own barrel connector and when the thunder rolls, I disconnect all coax inside coax at the entry panel. This setup also including the coax from the emergency 2m J-pole in the attic that runs outside through the soffit, thru an arrestor, and then back inside to the shack.  I don't remember how much I actually spent when I put in the shack, but it certainly wasn't as much as Dale did.  But then my setup is probably much simpler.  I'm pretty sure that all in it was less than $500.  That's peanuts compared to the cost of a new tranciever, and not even close to the cost of the hotel while they rebuild your house after the fire!
The only thing I would add to what Dale said is that if you have a vertical consider a tilt base - they make it really easy to reduce your exposure. Here in Florida I consider it mandatory and tip that hunk of aluminum horizontal when the storms move in.  Some times during the season it tilts up and down several times a day!  Even if you don't live in a high thunderstorm area, lightning protection is something you should have.  You may not need it, but if you ever need it, you will really need it!

--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602



Re: Lightning Protection

Rick - N7WE
 

Thanks for posting this Jerry.  As one who lives in "the lightning capital of the US,"  let me add a double ROGER THAT! to everything he said. 
I have 3 coax leads that come into the house and every one of them has its own lightning arrestor installed on a 8 ft ground rod which is bonded with all the equipment inside the shack.  There is a short run of about 6 ft for each coax to a pass thru drilled through the aluminum window frame.  It also provides the pass through for the station grounding and grounds the window frame.  Each coax has its own barrel connector and when the thunder rolls, I disconnect all coax inside coax at the entry panel. This setup also including the coax from the emergency 2m J-pole in the attic that runs outside through the soffit, thru an arrestor, and then back inside to the shack.  I don't remember how much I actually spent when I put in the shack, but it certainly wasn't as much as Dale did.  But then my setup is probably much simpler.  I'm pretty sure that all in it was less than $500.  That's peanuts compared to the cost of a new tranciever, and not even close to the cost of the hotel while they rebuild your house after the fire!
The only thing I would add to what Dale said is that if you have a vertical consider a tilt base - they make it really easy to reduce your exposure. Here in Florida I consider it mandatory and tip that hunk of aluminum horizontal when the storms move in.  Some times during the season it tilts up and down several times a day!  Even if you don't live in a high thunderstorm area, lightning protection is something you should have.  You may not need it, but if you ever need it, you will really need it!

--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


Lightning Protection

Jerry N9AVY
 

This showed up a few minutes ago on local club reflector and I believe it's a worthwhile read.  Dale is an old friend who move from IL (my area) out to Iowa many years ago. Before he went to work for Collins, he worked at designing RF shielded booths for testing radio equipment - lot of copper screen !

If you have outdoor antennas, I think you should read this (especially those in Florida "the lightning capital of US).

Jerry  n9avy

Everyone on this thread:

I  can not help but throw in some comments on this most important and necessary aspect of ham radio operating.  I'll try to be brief, but please bear in mind that there are a lot of aspects to this seemingly simple task that deserve some serious consideration, particularly as regards lightning safety.

First, I strongly suggest that all persons in need of installing and running transmission lines go out and buy, beg, or borrow a copy of Grounding and Bonding for the Radio Amateur, by Ward Silver, N0AX.  This ARRL book was released early last year and discusses many safety aspects of antenna and radio station grounding, including lightning protection.  Full disclosure: I was one of the reviewers and contributors for the book.

Now, to the topic at hand.  Way back in 1976, which was when I moved into my Crystal Lake house, I committed many of the very installation errors (out of ignorance) that I now fight hard to get hams NOT to do when putting in their installation.  I was a rooftop antenna farmer at that time (located in Coventry West, not far from Crystal Lake South HS) and I brought all of my radio coax and TV antenna cables inside via roof-mounted feed-thrus, then fed the cables down to the attic and inside the walls to various destinations within.  It was the perfect set-up for creating what I have since termed the "Kingsford Effect", so-named for the possible conversion of a wooden structure into a material used for outdoor cooking.  I grounded the antenna masts and roof tripod supports (2 of them) via #8 wire run on the roof and dropped down to a ground rod at the back of the house.

There are all kinds of ways to actually bring the cables into the house.  The actual approach taken by any given ham is largely the result of preference, cost, and ease of installation.  My  issue is that NONE of these approaches are safe unless lightning protection is included as part of the installation package and all protectors are properly grounded.  I will also keep this discussion limited to those installations having no more than 3 or 4 coax cables and maybe 1 rotator or remote RF switch control cable. 

For those using the "drill hole, install pipe, pull cables, and pack to preclude insects" approach, all you need to do is sink an 8 foot ground rod just outside the wall hole and place one of the readily available multi-protector mounts onto the top of the rod.  That effectively grounds and protects those cables outside of the house.  You may have to get inventive if you also need to mount an 8-line control protector for a rotator or remote RF switch.  (What, you were not planning to protect the switch?   Trust me when I say that if lightning gets onto the RF cables, it will almost surely couple onto the unshielded control cables, too.  The rotator or switch might get zapped, but you do not want lightning energy coming along that cable and into the shack.)

Next, and this is VERY important:  you MUST bond that ground rod to the equipment in your station AND you must also bond it to the electrical ground of your AC service panel.  (Yes, allowable as an Auxiliary Ground per the NEC.)  The reason: failure to bond all of the shack equipment together and failure to bond the station ground to the AC power electrical service panel ground allows a very severe voltage differential to develop during a lightning strike.  It is that differential that causes so much damage to equipment in the shack and in the house. Also, the power panel should be equipped with a while-house surge protector.   

Next, please note John's comments below about having a grounding type of switch in the shack for his coax cables.  I discovered that many DXers use a similar scheme here in Iowa when I addressed the Eastern Iowa DX Association on the topic of lightning protection in October, 2016.  Consider this:  by using such a switch as the sole means of grounding and protecting the coax cables, you are allowing the lightning energy to travel all the way into your shack and right onto your operating desk or table.  Is that what you REALLY want?  These types of switches are fine as follow-on protectors when external protector for each coax line are installed outside the shack or house.  Their most useful function is to reduce induced currents in the cables that may occur in the run from the outside protector to the shack equipment.  After all, that cable "looks" like a conductor to close-by energy currents.

Finally, I told the EIDXA that I can not endorse the MFJ (and any similar feed-thru entrance panels) that are sold for use with windows or in eaves.  Why?  Take a careful look at what they offer.  Assuming that the owner does actually attach a proper (AWG 4 or 6) ground wire to the panel, the coax cables that attach to the panel via the provided feed-thru coax connectors will have their outer shields grounded, but no protection to the center conductors.  Fortunately, that problem is rather easily fixed if a coax protector is installed on each line just to the outside of the window or eave panel.  So, for those who chose to use on of these panels, do not forget to install the protectors on it.

Now, for the kicker on these panels: have you noticed the adjustable feed-thru clamp that lows you to pass a rotator cable connector thru the panel?  OK, you pass the connector thru and close the clamp around the cable.  So?  You have the same problem as was discussed for the wall holes.  Bottom line: there needs to be a multi-line protector just outside the panel for that control cable.

Yes, I know that putting in the protectors and proper grounding takes time and costs money that you would prefer to put into rigs.  I get that.  I did my design and installation out here way back in 2000.  At today's prices for the roughly 18 cables I installed, the protectors, ground rods and #2 wire, and the weatherproof entrance boxes I used would cost around $2500 to $3000.  Was it worth it?  Look at it this way: when I moved out here in 2000, I had been hamming for 38 years.  I had ZERO lightning hits on my antennas in those years.  Then, I got hit 2 years in succession: 2008 and 2009.  The 2008 had the extra thrill factor of me holding the mic in my hand of the radio whose antenna got hit and talking (passing emergency traffic)..  Net result: ZERO damage to me or any equipment in my shack or house..  Yeah, it was worth every penny.  Antennas and coax cables on the tower got blasted to bits and one coax protector was blown up internally..  Everything on the tower should be considered as expendable.

So, lots of great ideas so far on how to get thru the wall.  I hope everyone will add in the safety aspects of lightning protection and proper grounding to their installation ideas.

73, Dale
WA9ENA
Former MCWA member, now in Monticello, IA 
Retired EMC engineer from Rockwell Collins            


Kosovo DXCC ???

Jerry N9AVY
 

"Kosovo has been listed as DXCC country - immediately and retroactive. If you have worked Kosovo, in the past, it will count as new country (maybe). Barry Shelley, (former CFO) the new interim CEO, will draft the rules and the issue of how far back the retroactive Contacts will be counted..  "

Jerry  N9AVY

This info may not be accurate until official announcement from ARRL


award rejections CM2RSV

Jerry N9AVY
 



i
    Endorsements have been REJECTED:
      
CM2RSV Alaska !    AL7MH no es Alaska sino es en el Estado de Arizona ! 



Re: New Ham Class Demo

 

I'll plan to be on the air also. Good luck!


Re: New Ham Class Demo

Joseph Molon <ljl2002@...>
 

Will be looking for you Steve.

Joe
KA1PPV  #1482


On Sat, Jan 20, 2018 at 03:54 PM, Steve R via Groups.Io wrote:

Next Thursday night the 25th, I will be setting up a demo station for our new hams class. I am going to primarily demonstrate PSK, but also show some of the other modes. I will be on 40M or 30M. I have an old isotron antenna I have been testing the last couple of weeks and it seems to be working fine.

Look for us on 40M and 30M around 7 pm to 9 pm Eastern time. My grid is FN02, just across lake from Buffalo, NY. I would appreciate some PSKers on the band to help me show off the digital world.

Thanks in Advance,

Steve
VA3FLF
2301


Re: Welcome

Joseph Molon <ljl2002@...>
 

Ray,
So glad that you decided to join PODXS.
You will definitely have fun here.

CUL
Joe
KA1PPV  #1482


On Sat, Jan 20, 2018 at 01:07 PM, Jim K5SP wrote:

Please join me in welcoming our new PODXS070 member(s). 

2596 Ray  K8RLE

Jim, K5SP #483
Membership Director

--
Jim,  K5SP #483
Member Services Director


Re: New Ham Class Demo

Rick - N7WE
 

Steve-
I will look for you, but I won't be on until about 7:30 PM EST.  Kudos to you for doing a new ham class AND introducing them to PSK31!
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


New Ham Class Demo

Steve VA3FLF/KM4FLF
 

Next Thursday night the 25th, I will be setting up a demo station for our new hams class. I am going to primarily demonstrate PSK, but also show some of the other modes. I will be on 40M or 30M. I have an old isotron antenna I have been testing the last couple of weeks and it seems to be working fine.

Look for us on 40M and 30M around 7 pm to 9 pm Eastern time. My grid is FN02, just across lake from Buffalo, NY. I would appreciate some PSKers on the band to help me show off the digital world.

Thanks in Advance,

Steve
VA3FLF
2301


Welcome

Jim K5SP
 

Please join me in welcoming our new PODXS070 member(s). 

2596 Ray  K8RLE

Jim, K5SP #483
Membership Director

--
Jim,  K5SP #483
Member Services Director


P4/S50M on 20M

Dan Morris - KZ3T
 

Janko is on 20M working

Dan Morris KZ3T 070-1065
dbmorris315@gmail.com

I live to live for Him!


Re: K8RLE

Matthew King - AK4MK <kk4cps@...>
 

I worked him last night and prompted him to join, which he did.  Unfortunately, he didn't give us an email address.  That means we can't contact him to give him his member #, reflector information, and other info about the club.

I guess he'll just have to wait until I get a new member packet out to him in order to get that info.

If someone should work him, please get his email address and send it to Jim so that he can send out the standard welcome email with all of his information.

73

Matt King
AK4MK - 070 #1708
PODXS 070 Club Executive Director


On Fri, Jan 19, 2018 at 5:45 PM, Jim K5SP <jinnis@...> wrote:
No, that email address bounces.

73
Jim

On 1/19/2018 4:15 PM, Joseph Molon wrote:
Jim,
I just worked Ray in December and made the pitch for PODXS and he said that he was going to join.
He has an email address on QRZ.com.  Is it not current?

Joe
KA1PPV  #1482


 On Fri, Jan 19, 2018 at 02:00 PM, Jim K5SP wrote:

 > If anyone knows Ray K8RLE, or works him on the air soon, let him know that I need his email address to process his application.

Without the email address we have no way of letting him know his number and other information.

73,
Jim K5SP
Member Services Director




--
Jim,  K5SP #483
Member Services Director











--
Jim,  K5SP #483
Member Services Director





Re: 2017 STICKERS - Dayton, HamCation, and Field Day

B C <k9wis@...>
 

Our club station N9AW, W/K Amatuer radio club of Greater Milwaukee, worked some PSK31 FD...they gave our CW station a run for their money..it was a good outing
Brian K9WIS

---- Matthew King - AK4MK <kk4cps@gmail.com> wrote:

John - I'm looking for 2017 FD participants. 2018 Winter Field Day is in 2
weekends, but 2018 ARRL Field Day is 6 months away yet.

Did you operate PSK-31 on 2017's FD?

Lewis, I got you added to the list.

Anybody else, please send your name, event, and 070 #.

*73*

*Matt King*
*AK4MK - 070 #1708*
*PODXS 070 Club Executive Director*


On Wed, Jan 17, 2018 at 3:32 PM, John Etling <john@k3jae.com> wrote:

Will most likely work a little PSK (a few hours yet to be determined) on
FD. Depends on how things go.



*I’m Just Sayin’*

*73 de K3JAE*



*John*







*From:* 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] *On Behalf Of *Matthew
King - AK4MK
*Sent:* Wednesday, January 17, 2018 14:29
*To:* 070Club@groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [070Club] 2017 STICKERS - Dayton, HamCation, and Field Day



Alrighty - LAST CALL on Dayton, HamCation, or Field Day 2017 PSK-31
participants.



If you're not on the list below and should be, please let me know ASAP.



*73*



*Matt King*

*AK4MK - 070 #1708*

*PODXS 070 Club Executive Director*



*2017 FD*

*2017 Dayton*

*070 #*

*Call*

*070 #*

*Call*

815

K8TOM

908

K3USC

2577

K3RTK

2110

AJ3DI

908

K3USC

143

WB5NHL

1470

VA7GEM

1708

AK4MK

797

N9JCA

2104

N4MAR

2110

AJ3DI

1615

KF8MZ

483

K5SP

1140

K0ACP

454

N9AVY

2504

W4JWC

143

WB5NHL

2063

K8CMO

526

VA3TPS

124

KF3AA

1739

K7PAX

1708

AK4MK

2104

N4MAR

2312

KM4SLW

2321

KM4PJJ

2516

K2EXE

1479

AJ4TF

1602

N7WE

1140

K0ACP

1601

KC0OIO

824

NU4C

718

N2MLP

2542

KI4VMK

1673

W3WMU

1611

W9SMR/9

2504

W4JWC

2063

K8CMO

1620

KC9UR

1513

W7JSD





On Thu, Jan 11, 2018 at 10:43 AM, Sid Downey <sid47@cox.net> wrote:

Matt,



I took part in 2017 Field Day.



Sid

W7JSD

1513


On Jan 9, 2018, at 2:04 PM, Matthew King - AK4MK <kk4cps@gmail.com> wrote:

*Please let me know if you attended Dayton, HamVention, and/or your local
ARRL Field Day in 2017. *



I'm trying to get a proper list of recipients for each of these stickers
so we can get them sent out in the next mailing.



Thanks, y'all!



*73*



*Matt King*

*AK4MK - 070 #1708*

*PODXS 070 Club Executive Director*







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