Date   

FT-1000MP

Jerry N9AVY
 


Hi Rick !
 
Finally  called Burghardt in SD about my radio and got to talk with a real, live person !     There are 2 radios ahead of mine so looks like they'll be getting at it next week.   Sure hope it get here by TDW  !!!  Can't imagine using clunky old TS-570S during TDW.  Worst radio I ever bought; would dump it but it has 6m  and the other 6m radio is an RCI5450 which has a roger beep !  
 
Turned on radio this morning and band was DEAD !   Ugh !!!  
 
Take care and CUL
 
 
73,  Jerry  n9avy


Re: Band Plan

Steve VA3FLF/KM4FLF
 

Thanks Steve. Very helpful. 

Steve
VA3FLF


On May 9, 2018, at 21:11, Stephen Melachrinos <melachri@...> wrote:

I was rushing to get this written this morning before work and I need to update and correct a few things that I wrote in haste.

Changes are in bold.

Steve
W3HF


-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Melachrinos <melachri@...>
To: 070Club <070Club@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 9, 2018 6:30 am
Subject: Re: [070Club] Band Plan

Steve -

Any agreement has to start with someone making a suggestion, and others "agreeing" with it. As more pile on, the agreement becomes more prevalent. And eventually (hopefully) it becomes pervasive.

(Note: a "gentleman's agreement" simply means there's no legal imperative, only that well-behaved gentlemen agree to follow it. "Legal imperative" includes both rules/laws and formal contracts, but a gentleman's agreement is typically never written down by the parties involved. The Wikipedia page on "Gentlemen's Agreement" states that one "...relies upon the honor of the parties for its fulfillment, rather than being in any way enforceable.")

PSK31 was developed by Peter Martinez; Peter released it to the amateur community in December 1998.The earliest published reference to operating frequencies I can find is a May 1999 article in QST by Steve Ford (p41) that states that most of the PSK activity on 20m was between 14068 and 14080. One year later, Steve Ford published a second article (QST May 2000, p42) that says that 14070 was the "hot hangout." Of course, the 070 club was founded in mid-2000 and took its name from the frequency in use, so the common practice observed by the 070 club founders was consistent with the publications of that time. (I picked up on the mode from that year 2000 article and a successor article the next month on Small Wonder Labs' PSK20, and got on the air in November 2000 with a PSK20.)

(What's interesting about the Small Wonder Labs series of transceivers is that they were rock-bound--they were crystal-controlled, with no tuning and no easy way to change crystals. That means that by the time they came out, PSK31 operations were "locked in" to certain frequencies. SWL had models for 10m, 20m, 30m, and 40m, and there was a derivative design for 80m sold by the NJQRP club. That further documents the operating frequencies in use, at least for those bands.)

I think the basic premise was that the various frequencies were within the generally-accepted digital band plans and weren't considered over-subscribed with other modes. In other words, 14070 (and 21070 and 18100 etc) were not already identified in other gentleman's agreements as being in use for other modes. Someone (could have been Peter Martinez, or Skip Teller, or Nick Fedoseev, or any of the other folks who were pioneering the mode or early software) had to suggest where on the dial to operate so the other few operators could find them. And that spread and became pervasive for over 15 years. Even the 070 club's archives document that, as we have had an "operating frequencies" page since about 2006 or so.

But I don't know if we'll ever be able to find out who was the first to suggest it or who the first "gentlemen" were. 

Steve
W3HF


Re: Band Plan

Stephen Melachrinos
 

I was rushing to get this written this morning before work and I need to update and correct a few things that I wrote in haste.

Changes are in bold.

Steve
W3HF


-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Melachrinos <melachri@...>
To: 070Club <070Club@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 9, 2018 6:30 am
Subject: Re: [070Club] Band Plan

Steve -

Any agreement has to start with someone making a suggestion, and others "agreeing" with it. As more pile on, the agreement becomes more prevalent. And eventually (hopefully) it becomes pervasive.

(Note: a "gentleman's agreement" simply means there's no legal imperative, only that well-behaved gentlemen agree to follow it. "Legal imperative" includes both rules/laws and formal contracts, but a gentleman's agreement is typically never written down by the parties involved. The Wikipedia page on "Gentlemen's Agreement" states that one "...relies upon the honor of the parties for its fulfillment, rather than being in any way enforceable.")

PSK31 was developed by Peter Martinez; Peter released it to the amateur community in December 1998.The earliest published reference to operating frequencies I can find is a May 1999 article in QST by Steve Ford (p41) that states that most of the PSK activity on 20m was between 14068 and 14080. One year later, Steve Ford published a second article (QST May 2000, p42) that says that 14070 was the "hot hangout." Of course, the 070 club was founded in mid-2000 and took its name from the frequency in use, so the common practice observed by the 070 club founders was consistent with the publications of that time. (I picked up on the mode from that year 2000 article and a successor article the next month on Small Wonder Labs' PSK20, and got on the air in November 2000 with a PSK20.)

(What's interesting about the Small Wonder Labs series of transceivers is that they were rock-bound--they were crystal-controlled, with no tuning and no easy way to change crystals. That means that by the time they came out, PSK31 operations were "locked in" to certain frequencies. SWL had models for 10m, 20m, 30m, and 40m, and there was a derivative design for 80m sold by the NJQRP club. That further documents the operating frequencies in use, at least for those bands.)

I think the basic premise was that the various frequencies were within the generally-accepted digital band plans and weren't considered over-subscribed with other modes. In other words, 14070 (and 21070 and 18100 etc) were not already identified in other gentleman's agreements as being in use for other modes. Someone (could have been Peter Martinez, or Skip Teller, or Nick Fedoseev, or any of the other folks who were pioneering the mode or early software) had to suggest where on the dial to operate so the other few operators could find them. And that spread and became pervasive for over 15 years. Even the 070 club's archives document that, as we have had an "operating frequencies" page since about 2006 or so.

But I don't know if we'll ever be able to find out who was the first to suggest it or who the first "gentlemen" were. 

Steve
W3HF

_._,_._,_


Re: Band Plan

 

Great explanation, Steve.  Thanks for the info!


Re: Welcome

Fr Richard R
 

Welcome to the club Trey
See ya on the waterfall soon. 

And welcome to all you new members I missed. 

Fr Richard 
WB8YXF 
2328


On May 9, 2018, at 12:05, Jim K5SP <jinnis@...> wrote:

Please join me in welcoming our new PODXS070 member(s).

2626  Trey   KI5WA

Jim, K5SP #483
Membership Director


--
Jim,  K5SP #483
Member Services Director


Welcome

Jim K5SP
 

Please join me in welcoming our new PODXS070 member(s).

2626  Trey   KI5WA

Jim, K5SP #483
Membership Director


--
Jim,  K5SP #483
Member Services Director


Re: Band Plan

Stephen Melachrinos
 

Steve -

Any agreement has to start with someone making a suggestion, and others "agreeing" with it. As more pile on, the agreement becomes more prevalent. And eventually (hopefully) it becomes pervasive.

(Note: a "gentleman's agreement" simply means there's no legal imperative, only that well-behaved gentlemen agree to follow it.)

The earliest published reference I can find is a May 1999 article in QST by Steve Ford (p41) that states that most of the PSK activity on 20m is between 14068 and 14080. One year later, Steve Ford published a second article (QST May 2000, p42) that says that 14070 was the "hot hangout." Of course, the 070 club was founded in mid-1999 and took its name from the frequency in use, so the common practice preceded the publications. (I picked up on the mode from that year 2000 article and a successor article the next month on Small Wonder Labs' PSK20, and got on the air in November 2000.)

I think the basic premise was that the various frequencies were within the generally-accepted band plans and weren't considered over-subscribed with other modes. In other words, 14070 (and 21070 and 18100 etc) were not already identified in other gentleman's agreements as being in use for other modes. Someone (could have been Peter Martinez, or Skip Teller, or Nick Fedoseev, or any of the other folks who were pioneering the mode or early software) had to suggest where on the dial to operate so the other few operators could find them. And that spread and became pervasive for over 15 years. Even the 070 club's archives document that, as we have had an "operating frequencies" page since about 2006 or so.

But I don't know is we'll ever be able to find out who was the first to suggest it or who the first "gentlemen" were. 

Steve
W3HF


-----Original Message-----
From: Steve R via Groups.Io <oldjavadrinker@...>
To: 070Club <070Club@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, May 8, 2018 10:16 pm
Subject: [070Club] Band Plan

I am doing a little studying for my prep on Ham radio Now, I was looking at the band plan issue, and discovered that the band plan doesnt specifically mention where each mode is to be used in the bands. For example, 20M has 14.070 14.095 says RTTY, however IARU describes it as narrow band digital.

Then it discusses a "gentlemen's agreement for suggested frequencies and had 14.070 as PSK. Exactly who and when was this gentlemens agreement made?

Any background would be helpful.

Thanks,

Steve VA3FLF
2301


Band Plan

Steve VA3FLF/KM4FLF
 

I am doing a little studying for my prep on Ham radio Now, I was looking at the band plan issue, and discovered that the band plan doesnt specifically mention where each mode is to be used in the bands. For example, 20M has 14.070 14.095 says RTTY, however IARU describes it as narrow band digital.

Then it discusses a "gentlemen's agreement for suggested frequencies and had 14.070 as PSK. Exactly who and when was this gentlemens agreement made?

Any background would be helpful.

Thanks,

Steve VA3FLF
2301


Re: An interesting article ...

Paul Milward <nu4c@...>
 

Has FT8 affected PSK 31 operations? Yes it has, but poor propagation due to the solar cycle is the biggest culprit in current PSK OPs. 
I completed 366, but it took until autumn 2017. So I decided to try again. I usually operate less than an hour per day. My minimalist station has only a 43ft vertical so 90% of my contacts are USA east of the Mississippi. But I am still on track for at least one PSK QSO per day in 2018.
Get on the air with PSK31, contacts can be made, even from simple stations.
GL 73
we
Paul NU4C

Sent from my Galaxy Tab® A


Welcome

Jim K5SP
 

Please join me in welcoming our new PODXS070 member(s).

2625  Doug   N4AHO

Jim, K5SP #483
Membership Director


--
Jim,  K5SP #483
Member Services Director


Re: An interesting article ...

Jerry N9AVY
 

A beam at 40 ft is always a game changer.  Sometimes with poor conditions my beam will be aimed East and I won't hear stations from West or South... if Asia is on, I probably won't hear them.  :-(   When noise level here is S-9 or more, many stations will be lost in noise.
 
jerry
 



From: Rick - N7WE <n7we1980@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 7, 2018 12:30 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] An interesting article ...

Ray-
Don't give up on PSK31.  Even with prop as poor as it is, there is still activity on 20m during the daylight hours and 40m after the sun sets.  When you don't see a signal on the band, try calling CQ  every 30 seconds.  Bet you won't go 10 minutes without a contact.  Yup, I'm in an HOA too, and restrictions make it harder than having a tower and beam.  But even measly antennas work.  I worked Carlos - TI8II on 20m at 15:31 UTC today with 30w from my driveway with a 20m Hamstick on a magmount on the roof of my Honda CRV.  It doesn't get much poorer for a poor antenna!  599 both ways.  So keep trying.  The harder it is, the more satisfying the QSO is...at least for me.  The Three Day Weekend Contest is coming up June 1-3 and I guarantee that no matter how bad prop is, there will be a bunch of PSKers on the bands.  Hope to work you then.
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602



Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: An interesting article ...

Rick - N7WE
 

Ray-
Don't give up on PSK31.  Even with prop as poor as it is, there is still activity on 20m during the daylight hours and 40m after the sun sets.  When you don't see a signal on the band, try calling CQ  every 30 seconds.  Bet you won't go 10 minutes without a contact.  Yup, I'm in an HOA too, and restrictions make it harder than having a tower and beam.  But even measly antennas work.  I worked Carlos - TI8II on 20m at 15:31 UTC today with 30w from my driveway with a 20m Hamstick on a magmount on the roof of my Honda CRV.  It doesn't get much poorer for a poor antenna!  599 both ways.  So keep trying.  The harder it is, the more satisfying the QSO is...at least for me.  The Three Day Weekend Contest is coming up June 1-3 and I guarantee that no matter how bad prop is, there will be a bunch of PSKers on the bands.  Hope to work you then.
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


Re: An interesting article ...

Ray Clements
 

Buddy. Thank you for your comments.

If propagation conditions were good, there would be no interest in FT8. I love working PSK and to a lesser extent RTTY, but propagation is poor, especially for those with limited stations like mine. I live in an HOA and have to have my antennas hidden from view, so I have a 66 ft OCF wire antenna strung at a height of 21 ft off the ground, far from ideal.

At 1300 UTC, I turned on my radio and started looking for signals. On 40m, all I could hear was noise. On 20 m, the noise level was lower, but I could not hear any signals. On 17m , 15m, 12m, and 10m, there was little noise, but neither could I detect any signals. So I had two choices: turn off the radio and pursue other interests, or fire up WSJT-X and check out FT8. From the fall of 2015, unit the spring of 2018 when I decided to check out FT8, my choice was to turn off the radio. I made only 11 HF contacts during that 2 1/2 year period. I suspect I was not alone in my inactivity.

Over the past six weeks, I have confirmed 20 DXCC entities using FT8 whereas I have only been able to confirm 3 using PSK modes. Non of those entities were new for me, but at least FT8 gives me hope of confirming the last 6 entities I need for DXCC.  I became a ham in 2013 and made most of my DXCC contacts in 2014 and early 2015 when propagation was reasonable.

The last half of the 20th century experienced some of the highest solar activity on record. Many of the hams who express a profound distaste for FT8 have been on the air for decades and experienced great radio propagation resulting from that solar activity.   However, with the beginning of the 21st century, solar activity began to decline and some have even wondered if we may experience another solar minimum such as the Maunder Minimum that occurred in the 17th century, plunging Europe into a mini-Ice Age.

We are now in the solar minimum between solar cycles 24 and 25. Cycle 25 is expected to be similar to cycle 24, so the best we can expect is conditions similar to 2014; that won't happen until 2025.  Until then, propagation on the upper bands will be poor. For those hams who live in rural areas and can afford to erect tall towers and large antennas, fed by legal-limit amplifiers, the 80m and 160m bands will be the bands of choice. For the large numbers of hams who live in urban and suburban areas who are unable to erect tall towers and large antennas, their choices will be to turn off the radio until solar activity improves, or resort to modes such a FT8 that can decode signals that may be too weak to hear. Thus, I see Joe Taylor as the savior of amateur radio over the next 5 years rather than the author of its demise.

As we get close to the peak of solar cycle 25, hopefully, there will be limited need for FT8. In fact, FT8 may become useless as stations will be able to detect so many signals that there will be a massive pileup on the FT8 frequencies. In that situation, people will go back to less sensitive digital modes such as PSK. We need options that will work when propagation is good and we need options that will work when propagation is poor. Joe Taylor and friends are trying to provide those later options.

Ray N9RWC







------ Original Message ------
Received: 05:23 PM CDT, 05/06/2018
From: "F.R. Ashley" <gdadx2@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] An interesting article ...


What a silly article, not interesting at all.   Just one rambling diatribe against JT modes.   All of this FT/JT hysteria is getting rather ridiculous.   Would you rather the bands be dead quiet, or teeming with digital signals (and others)?   FT/JT isn't going away unless something else comes along which hams find more interesting and fun to use.    Get on the air, operate PSK or whatever mode you wish and quit worrying about the sky falling.

73,

Buddy WB4M



On 5/6/2018 12:20 PM, Jerry N9AVY wrote:





Re: An interesting article ...

Kenneth W. Campbell <n6pcd@...>
 

I'm just SURE that back in the day, some spark gap guys JUST KNEW that the new-fangled CW mode would destroy the hobby...


Re: An interesting article ...

F.R. Ashley
 

What a silly article, not interesting at all.   Just one rambling diatribe against JT modes.   All of this FT/JT hysteria is getting rather ridiculous.   Would you rather the bands be dead quiet, or teeming with digital signals (and others)?   FT/JT isn't going away unless something else comes along which hams find more interesting and fun to use.    Get on the air, operate PSK or whatever mode you wish and quit worrying about the sky falling.

73,

Buddy WB4M




Re: An interesting article ...

Brian (N2MLP)
 

I think the problem is more based on laziness

 

 

 

========================

         de N2MLP Brian

       Monroe County PA

 

 

========================

 

 

From: 070Club@groups.io [mailto:070Club@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jerry N9AVY
Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 12:20 PM
To: 070Club
Subject: [070Club] An interesting article ...

 

 

Did Joe Taylor Destroy Amateur Radio? - NT0Z

 

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com


An interesting article ...

Jerry N9AVY
 


31 Flavors Results

Rick - N7WE
 

Results are in for the 31 Flavors Contest.  This year there were 25 logs submitted.  13 entrants managed to make contact using all 6 modes.

This year’s winners are:

1st Overall, 1st in Medium Power,  and Top Dawg was N5SLY – Lee of Sherman TX.
1st in Low Power was WS8G – Rick of Beavercreek, OH
QRP – no entry

Complete results can be viewed by clicking HERE.  Congratulations to our winners and thank you to everyone who played. 


No upcoming contests for the remainder of May, but June has two.  First TDW June 1-3 followed by June High Band Challenge June 16-17.  Details on the website.

--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


Re: Pls help KG5RMJ

stan W9SMR
 

After my QSO with Bill he reported that he currently has 42 in the log. Almost there and getting ready for TDW.

Tnx fer helping out a newbie!

73,
Stan
W9SMR
#1611
________________________________________
From: 070Club@groups.io <070Club@groups.io> on behalf of Rick - N7WE <n7we1980@gmail.com>
Sent: Saturday, May 5, 2018 5:59 PM
To: 070Club@groups.io
Subject: Re: [070Club] Pls help KG5RMJ

Thanks to all who gave it a try. That's one of the great things about this club - willing to reach out and help!
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


Re: Pls help KG5RMJ

Jerry N9AVY
 

Donations gladly accepted.  


Jerry  N9AVY


From: Rick - N7WE <n7we1980@...>
To: 070Club@groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 5, 2018 5:01 PM
Subject: Re: [070Club] Pls help KG5RMJ

Jerry-
About that TS-570 and the FT-1000....I do believe a gentleman of your excellence and distinction should surely have a K3s!
--
Rick - N7WE
070 - #1602


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