Date   

Re: FLDigi

Robert Sheskin <rsheskin@...>
 

Works great for me. Only quirk really for me some fonts cause it to
leave artifacts on the screen, easily cured changing fonts. I am using
the latest beta, 3.15 worked fine also.
Bob N3PPH

On 4/9/2010 11:15 AM, Karen Russo wrote:

Is anyone using FLDigi with Win 7? Anyone using it successfully?

73 - Karen W4KRN




FLDigi

Karen Russo
 

Is anyone using FLDigi with Win 7? Anyone using it successfully?

73 - Karen W4KRN


What

Bob DeRosa <sgtblowfly731@...>
 

What a great summary of BPSK-31. Agree completely. I remember when this mode was getting popular,
the die hard RTTY ops were running scared.

Bob WA2VMO
PODXS #1000




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


What's your favorite PSK flavor? - Fifth and final notes in a series...

K5PAX
 

What I like about… BPSK31

Well, just about everybody likes this mode.

I’m pretty sure that this isn’t just a matter of chance. BPSK31 is a very well engineered mode.

When Peter Martinez G3PLX created this mode, he certainly had a set of design criteria in mind.

First, he wanted it narrow. The aim was to fit a large number of BPSK31 signals within the footprint of a single SSB signal. And narrow it is. A well-tuned BPSK31 signal, not overdriven, is right around the same bandwidth as a fast CW signal.

Narrow signals are really terrific, but you need the ability to manage single-signal decoding within the received bandwidth. When done right, as with BPSK, it permits you to tune your transceiver once, and then dance around the waterfall with your cursor. Compare this to CW, where if more than one signal within the received bandwidth, you need filters to tune out the unwanted signals.

Next, G3PLX wanted it the right speed. At around 50 words per minute (using small letters), BPSK supports a very nice chat speed for touch typists. It is just a little slower than RTTY, but just about right for many people. I know I can stay in front of the type-ahead buffer. It is also not too bad for speedy two-finger typists.

I can’t say too much about the right speed from a human factors engineering point of view. Too fast, and we feel inadequate when typing. Think about how we all try to speed up typing for the BPSK63 or BPSK125 modes. That usually causes my heart to race. Slower speeds are even more frustrating. I’ve used BPSK10 and Throb modes and watched my blood pressure rise waiting for the transmission to catch up with my typing. The right speed is what makes BPSK such a friendly mode. For me, it is just the right speed for a good chat.

G3PLX wanted the mode to be sensitive. By the numbers BPSK31 is about two-thirds as sensitive as human decoded CW sent at about 20 words per minute. That’s very impressive for a machine mode going twice as fast. In practice, I have found BPSK31 to be even more sensitive. This human can decode a BPSK31 message printing at 50-60 percent copy – I can interpret messages easily when they have single letter and single word garbles. BPSK31 doesn’t drop out the garbles – some error correcting modes do that – but passes them through. This helps me interpret messages that are less perfect – particularly for routine messages run from a standard macro.

Let’s say a few words about error correction. G3PLX specifically did not want error correction to be part of this mode. Subsequent modes did include it (QPSK31, for example), but BPSK31 was created as a simple mode (relatively) that would not require massive computing power or high-accuracy synchronized hardware. Remember, it was running on machines manufactured in the last century.

BPSK31 was also designed to be fairly easy to tune. It can generally manage decent decoding with the cursor is off-center by as much as 25 percent of the signal width. Compare this to the finicky QPSK31 or other digimodes such as MFSK16. AFC components in your software help keep you in touch, even when a signal drifts.

So BPSK31 was clearly engineered for success. But other, unplanned, characteristics have made it even more of a winner.

The narrow signal of BPSK31 is very dense. This makes the trace stand out on a waterfall, even when there is lots of background noise. Compare this to diffuse signals, such as MFSK16 and wide-bandwidth Olivia. Those traces almost disappear when QRN is high. If you can’t see a signal, you can’t tune to it. BPSK31 has terrific visibility for weak signal DX.

In addition, the sensitivity of BPSK31 makes it just the ticket for small stations with limited antennas and barefoot operations. The transmitted power ‘sweet-spot’ for BPSK31 is between 20-50 watts [I’ll let the engineers argue this and explain why BPSK31 signals don’t improve with higher power]. Compare this with RTTY, SSB and even CW, where having less than 500 watts can leave you buried in a pileup.

The Verdict:

Weak signal reception: [+]
Ease of tuning: [+]
Visibility on the screen: [+]
Speed: [+]

Okay, so we like it a lot. Now go use it with a new appreciation.

TRY IT ALONG WITH ALL THOSE OTHER PSK FLAVORS NEXT WEEKEND DURING THE PODXS 070 CLUB PSK 31 FLAVORS CONTEST!

Rules at: www.podxs070.com


Welcome new member

J Budzowski <jbudzowski@...>
 

Pse welcome new 070 Club member Tom AB3IC #1146...73 de Jay N3DQU


What's your favorite PSK flavor? - Fourth of a series...

K5PAX
 

What I like about… QPSK63


For a long time, QPSK63 was just another mode on my menus that I had not tried.

Then I tripped across it unexpectedly when I was doing some emergency communications research. I was testing different digital emergency communications software and found one called FnPSK. This is a very nice package that allows easy net control and the transfer of small, pre-prepared text files. We were testing it out between a number of stations statewide, and having a very good time. We had been at it for a few hours when it sunk into my geezer-aged brain that the software developers had chosen QPSK63 as the digimode of choice.

“Now why did they do that?” – I asked my slower than average self. “Because QPSK63 is just a little bit better.” – came the answer.

QPSK63 is just a little bit better.

QPSK63 is faster than BPSK31, and just the ticket for short message transfers – you know, like in contests.

QPSK63 is a wider mode than QPSK31, so it is easier to tune than that mode, and a little less sensitive to drifting signals. By the numbers, it is just a shade below BPSK31 in tuning tolerance.

QPSK63 is a quadrature phase shift-keying mode with error correction, so it is just a little bit more sensitive to weak signals than BPSK63.

Of course it is not as fast as BPSK125, not quite as sensitive as QPSK31, and not quite as visible on the screen as a BPSK31 trace, but that’s just negative thinking. QPSK63 is a solid digimode with many things to recommend its use.

The Verdict:

Weak signal reception: [+]
Ease of tuning: [+]
Visibility on the screen: [okay – no marks]
Speed: [+]

So embrace your better self and try out QPSK63 – the mode that is a little bit better.

TRY IT NEXT WEEKEND DURING THE PODXS 070 CLUB PSK 31 FLAVORS CONTEST!

Rules at: www.podxs070.com


Certs mailed 04-07-2010

J Budzowski <jbudzowski@...>
 

070 Club membership certificates have been mailed out 04-07-2010 to the following members: WD0AJG, YB8EXL, HI8CJG, PU4ISA, KG4TTQ, KE6MGW, KA6MLE, K8GCU, OK1UUS, W1ORS, LU6DEZ, PS7YL, PS7DX, K8PEZ, N2JNZ and AL7CR. Pse send an email to n3dqu@yahoo.com when your certificate arrives to I know it got there ok...73 de Jay N3DQU


Re: Standard PSK Frequencies

Justin Mattes--KC2GIK
 

The thing I noticed is that on 40 Meters folks stay right at 7.035 and sit on top of each other, they don't budge I even hear Morse Code faintly. When 7.070 was the PSK hotspot for N. American stations, people drifted from 7.070-7.071 On 20 Meters people wander between 14.070 and 14.071, I have even workedPSK stations up around 14.072 sometimes when the bands are busy like during Field Day. Same thing on 30 Meters I see people drift between 10.140-10.142. Also during Field Day I NEVER drop my center frequency on 20 BELOW 14.070.5 because there are too many stations stepping on each other!!
I suspect come Field Day we're going to see stations pop u p on 7.070 again because 7.035 is still the world calling frequency and Field Day is just the
US and Canada.
Justin
Dave Wright wrote:

7070 has been the N. American standard whereas 7035 was more European
focused. I still see some activity around 7070, but with the large number
of Spanish-speaking hi-powered stations active around 7070 most evening,
most N. American PSKers seem to have moved to the 7035 area as well...which
is good, IMO, since now we are all around the same frequency rather than
being split between the two.

Dave
K3DCW

On Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 10:41 AM, ve7axu <4jmacfarlane@dccnet.com> wrote:


After five years of active PSK operations I have noticed gradual changes in
some of the frequencies in use for PSK. What are the frquencies in each band
that are now considered as the "standard" ones where I could expect to find
signals?

Particularly I notice that 40m seems to have shifted toward 7.035 but I
still see some operation at 7.070.

Thanks in advance for the advice.

VE7AXU (John #418)





Re: Standard PSK Frequencies

Dave Wright <hfradiopro@...>
 

7070 has been the N. American standard whereas 7035 was more European
focused. I still see some activity around 7070, but with the large number
of Spanish-speaking hi-powered stations active around 7070 most evening,
most N. American PSKers seem to have moved to the 7035 area as well...which
is good, IMO, since now we are all around the same frequency rather than
being split between the two.

Dave
K3DCW

On Wed, Apr 7, 2010 at 10:41 AM, ve7axu <4jmacfarlane@dccnet.com> wrote:



After five years of active PSK operations I have noticed gradual changes in
some of the frequencies in use for PSK. What are the frquencies in each band
that are now considered as the "standard" ones where I could expect to find
signals?

Particularly I notice that 40m seems to have shifted toward 7.035 but I
still see some operation at 7.070.

Thanks in advance for the advice.

VE7AXU (John #418)




--
hfradiopro@gmail.com
"It isn't radio unless it bounces off the sky"


Standard PSK Frequencies

ve7axu <4jmacfarlane@...>
 

After five years of active PSK operations I have noticed gradual changes in some of the frequencies in use for PSK. What are the frquencies in each band that are now considered as the "standard" ones where I could expect to find signals?

Particularly I notice that 40m seems to have shifted toward 7.035 but I still see some operation at 7.070.

Thanks in advance for the advice.

VE7AXU (John #418)


Re: 30m Tonight Anybody?

Eric Dallmann
 

Jeff,
 
No copy here near Chicago.  The bands are kind of lousy right now (from my perspective).  Nothing heard above 40-meters.  A few weak traces on 40, one very weak trace on 80.  Of course, W1AW is still copyable here.  Tonight might be a good time for QRO, but in general, W1AW never runs more power than needed, do they?
 
Anyway, hopefully we'll have better luck in the future.
 
73,
Eric/K9VIC

--- On Tue, 4/6/10, va3jff <va3jff@yahoo.ca> wrote:


From: va3jff <va3jff@yahoo.ca>
Subject: [070] 30m Tonight Anybody?
To: 070@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, April 6, 2010, 8:25 PM


 



Hi All.

I'll be on 30m tonight working PSK31, starting at 0130Z 7 April 2010 (Tues Eve USA time), for a while. Trying to help out my 30/30 score.

Hope to see you on the waterfall.

73/72
Jeff - VA3JFF








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


30m Tonight Anybody?

Jeff - VA3JFF / VE3CW
 

Hi All.

I'll be on 30m tonight working PSK31, starting at 0130Z 7 April 2010 (Tues Eve USA time), for a while. Trying to help out my 30/30 score.

Hope to see you on the waterfall.

73/72
Jeff - VA3JFF


What's your favorite PSK flavor? - Third of a series...

K5PAX
 

What I like about… BPSK125

Faster is better. And bigger is better. Right?

Well, maybe not when it comes to digimodes.

One of the nicest things about PSK is the balance of:

- bandwidth-efficiency (read narrow trace),
- sensitivity to low power signals (read no need to be a big gun), and
- speed of transmission.

That’s not too wide, not too much power, and not too fast – it’s just right. Like with Goldilocks and the three bears.

Think about a nice afternoon on 20 meter PSK. You can set the tuning and watch the entire bandspread of PSK signals without retuning. You can read with high accuracy transmissions that really don’t need to be more than 50 watts output. And you can plug along at a really reasonable conversational pace, even with bad typing skills. What could be better?

Well, a little speed is cool – like driving a high-powered sports car. But when is speed still cool without being downright silly – like driving a $200,000 Ferrari?

For me it the answer is BPSK125.

I mean it is really fast – at 200 WPM it is more than 3 times as fast as standard RTTY.

BPSK125 is fairly sensitive without having to crank up the power. While not as sensitive as BPSK31, it has a theoretical signal/noise ratio that looks a lot like standard RTTY.

BPSK125 is pretty easy to tune – it has a big trace that is not terribly wide – it is still a touch narrower than a standard RTTY signal. Pop the cursor in the middle and it will decode very readily.

Sure, there are faster, wider versions of PSK, but for me, when you get much past BPSK125, you lose the nice PSK balance that I really like.

The Verdict:

Weak signal reception: [-]
Ease of tuning: [+]
Visibility on the screen: [okay – no marks]
Speed: [++]


So indulge your need for speed and try BPSK125.

TRY IT NEXT WEEKEND DURING THE PODXS 070 CLUB PSK 31 FLAVORS CONTEST!

Rules at: www.podxs070.com


What's your favorite PSK flavor? - Second of a series...

K5PAX
 

What I like about…BPSK63

Well, it’s actually BPSK62.5, but I really like it - no matter what it’s called.

This mode was developed to go head to head with RTTY as a contesting mode, and does it ever. I personally think that it is about a head above RTTY for contesting.

First of all, BPSK63 is faster - 100 WPM versus 60 WPM for standard RTTY.

BPSK63 is more bandwidth â€" efficient too. It’s about one-fifth as wide as a standard RTTY trace.

BPSK63 is also more sensitive than RTTY -- about 3 dB better S/N ratio by the specifications.

So what’s not to like?

While BPSK63 is narrower than RTTY, its trace is twice as wide as that of BPSK31. Courtesy demands that it be used just outside the regular BPSK31 suggested frequencies. Some digimode etiquette experts suggest that it be used ‘channelized’, that is, centered on preset frequencies. In practice, this is seldom done.

While BPSK63 is more sensitive to weak signals than RTTY, it is a notch less sensitive than BPSK31. The BPSK63 fans say to just double your power, but that just admits a sensitivity loss. The data says it is about 3 dB less sensitive than BPSK31.

Tuning is easier though. The wide signal is a great target â€" just get the cursor somewhere in the middle. In the real world it seems to combat drifting also â€" less need to mouse-click adjust during a QSO.

Visibility on the screen is usually pretty good, but when a signal gets weak, the trace is not as dense as a BPSK31 trace, and may be harder to see.

In general though, it is a fabulous contest mode.

The Verdict:

Weak signal reception: [-]
Ease of tuning: [+]
Visibility on the screen: [okay â€" no marks]
Speed: [+]

A special note of appreciation: BPSK63 was developed by Moe Wheatley AJ4JY and Skip Teller KH6TY. Their contributions to the digimodes are many, and not that well recognized. BPSK63 came onto the scene when I first started with PSK. To my young eyes it was the best combination of features in a digimode. I continue to have a special affection for it.

TRY IT NEXT WEEKEND DURING THE PODXS 070 Club PSK 31 FLAVORS CONTEST!

Rules at: www.podxs070.com


Re: Certs mailed 03-31-2010

Jay <jbudzowski@...>
 

Ok Dan, my pleasure! 73 de Jay N3DQU

--- In 070@yahoogroups.com, Dan Smith <kd7uff@...> wrote:

Hi Jay,

Just wanted to let you know that my membership certificate showed up yesterday (Saturday) Thank you very much.
73
Dan/KD7UFF




________________________________
From: J Budzowski <jbudzowski@...>
To: 070 <070@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wed, March 31, 2010 12:17:49 PM
Subject: [070] Certs mailed 03-31-2010


070 Club membership certificates have been mailed out 03-31-2010 to the
following members: KE6WGG, K4NKY, CX5UR, AG4GM, KC8KCU, K1ESM, WA0YEI,
ON6DP, AC7QO, KD7UFF, K2TY, SV4FFL, W1LIC, KI4EIZ, ON6NA and AB8XG. Pse send
an email to n3dqu@yahoo. com when your certificate arrives so I know it got
there ok....73 de Jay N3DQU









Re: PSK Flavors - Question

Milton Garb <w6qe@...>
 

Let me shed a bit of light on the 50 psk contacts required for membership.
They need not be confirmed.
List them in alphabetical order by callsign, check the rules for completeness and submit.
I know if I'm wrong, somebody will be all over me with the correct info.
Milt.
w6qe
070-650
LONP #76

----- Original Message -----
From: harvey.licht@sprynet.com
To: 070@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 05, 2010 9:01 AM
Subject: [070] PSK Flavors - Question



Hi Tom:

You have it correct - KH6 and KL7 count twice, both as states and DXCC entities. I've noticed that different contests, particularly RTTY contests, deal with this differently, but we've gone with this interpretation as the clearest one for contesting purposes.

Check the PODXS website for information on what is acceptable as documentation. If you don't find your answer there, send an email to the appropriate PODXS staffer.

73

Harvey
K5PAX

__________________________________________________________

This looks like a fun contest and I plan on operating it...

For the multipliers, since KH6 and KL7 count both as states and as DXCC entities, are they worth 2 multipliers each (same question for the first US contact, regardless of state...)

Also, would you accept LotW dumps as proof of the 50 PSK contacts required for membership in PODS?

Thanks

Tom Shelton, AB3IC


PSK Flavors - Question

K5PAX
 

Hi Tom:

You have it correct - KH6 and KL7 count twice, both as states and DXCC entities. I've noticed that different contests, particularly RTTY contests, deal with this differently, but we've gone with this interpretation as the clearest one for contesting purposes.

Check the PODXS website for information on what is acceptable as documentation. If you don't find your answer there, send an email to the appropriate PODXS staffer.

73

Harvey
K5PAX

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

This looks like a fun contest and I plan on operating it...

For the multipliers, since KH6 and KL7 count both as states and as DXCC entities, are they worth 2 multipliers each (same question for the first US contact, regardless of state...)

Also, would you accept LotW dumps as proof of the 50 PSK contacts required for membership in PODS?

Thanks

Tom Shelton, AB3IC


PSK flavors - 2 Questions

K5PAX
 

Bob:

You can absolutely work others outside of your contest hours - this is a nice courtesy. These contacts can be scored for the other side of the QSO if they are within their contest hours. Feel free to submit your non-contest contacts in a check log.

I routinely hand out points outside my contest hours. It is a good way to rack up LONP contacts - at least for the BPSK41 QSOs.

On the N1MM question - any thoughts out there?

73

Harvey
K5PAX


___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Question #1: Are any of the N1MM users out there willing to share the configuration and setup they will be using this weekend in the flavors test?

Question #2: I may have to work during the contest hours here in the East, and so, I may not be able to compete. But, I was wondering if I could participate after hours and give folks in other time zones some points and submit my log as a "check log."

73

Bob
KB2VMG
#565, LONP #98


PSK Flavors - 2 Questions

kb2vmg
 

Question #1: Are any of the N1MM users out there willing to share the configuration and setup they will be using this weekend in the flavors test?

Question #2: I may have to work during the contest hours here in the East, and so, I may not be able to compete. But, I was wondering if I could participate after hours and give folks in other time zones some points and submit my log as a "check log."

73

Bob
KB2VMG
#565, LONP #98


Welcome new member

J Budzowski <jbudzowski@...>
 

Pse welcome new member Mike W5MIC #1145...73 de Jay N3DQU